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DiabetesBae

It’s always nice to have a bae. On today’s episode, you got one! I’m excited that this week’s guest on Healing In Hindsight is the lovely Simone Moore aka Diabetes Bae. Not only is she a type 1 diabetic but a registered nurse as well. You know I had to take advantage of that.

KEY POINTS

  • How her diagnosis shaped her career
  • Challenges she’s faced working in healthcare
  • A special glimpse into a diabetes education class

Find more at www.healinginhindsight.com

CONNECT WITH SIMONE

www.diabetesbae.com 

Instagram @diabetesbae

Clubhouse: @diabetesbae

CONNECT WITH THE SHOW

Healing in Hindsight™ is managed by host Taylor Daniele™ and Produced by We Are 8 Studios

Transcript
Taylor:

Hey, everybody.

Taylor:

Welcome back to another episode of healing in hindsight, and

Taylor:

today we have a special guest.

Taylor:

As as we do every Thursday, I am going to be sitting down with Simone more

Taylor:

AKA DiabetesBae, and Simone is such a.

Taylor:

Just wealth of knowledge and understanding.

Taylor:

And I really enjoyed this conversation.

Taylor:

She and I have talked multiple times offline.

Taylor:

and I really feel like you're going to enjoy this episode and all the

Taylor:

knowledge that she has to give.

Taylor:

She is not only a type one diabetic, but a nurse and diabetes educator.

Taylor:

So she is very familiar with a lot of things that you go through

Taylor:

from being diagnosed to what you should experience after you're first

Taylor:

diagnosed and being able to provide.

Taylor:

Not only information, but just the right education and understanding that you

Taylor:

need for yourself as a new diabetic.

Taylor:

she's got a lot of great stuff coming up, so be sure to check her out, make

Taylor:

sure you follow her on Instagram.

Taylor:

She is also a part of a group that does Clubhouse rooms on things.

Taylor:

She said, what was it?

Taylor:

Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays.

Taylor:

so be sure to follow her on clubhouse, follow her on Instagram

Taylor:

so you can keep up with all the great things that she's doing.

Taylor:

She's literally my diabetic sister from another Mister.

Taylor:

and I'm really excited for this conversation.

Taylor:

Let's do it.

Taylor:

Hi, Simone,

Simone:

Hi, Taylor.

Simone:

I am doing wonderful.

Simone:

How are you?

Taylor:

it.

Taylor:

Great.

Taylor:

I see you got the cool merch in the back.

Taylor:

We're going to have to find out what that's all about later.

Taylor:

I love shirts and stuff.

Taylor:

So anytime guests come on and they're like, I've got this

Taylor:

shirt, I've got this thing.

Taylor:

I'm like, tell me more, how can I get one because I need it.

Taylor:

well, I'm really excited to have you on the show for those who are not

Taylor:

familiar with you I guess I'll give you a little backstory of how we met.

Taylor:

it was a quiet day on clubhouse where I'm just roaming the halls, looking for rooms

Taylor:

to be in and trying to start my own rooms.

Taylor:

specifically towards diabetics.

Taylor:

It was pretty much crickets through most of the rooms that I ran, except

Taylor:

for one person who decided to show up.

Taylor:

And that's, that's Ms.

Taylor:

Simone here, AKA DiabetesBae.

Taylor:

I love your, your handle.

Taylor:

and we literally sat, how, how long did we talk?

Simone:

We talked for six hours.

Taylor:

It did not feel that at all.

Taylor:

It did not feel like that.

Taylor:

We had one guy pop in at the last minute, and we were both like

Taylor:

working on a winding down now, but we'll hang on just a little bit.

Taylor:

So, it is pretty much been two peas in a pod ever since.

Taylor:

And so I'm excited to actually have you on the pod and get to hear your

Taylor:

perspective as a type one diabetic.

Taylor:

So, if you don't mind just introduce yourself, who is Simone?

Taylor:

when were you diagnosed?

Taylor:

What are your passions?

Taylor:

What are things that you are working on?

Simone:

Okay, well first thank you for having me today.

Simone:

I will never forget that day.

Simone:

You're my first club house, new friend at random.

Simone:

We found each other.

Simone:

So, so many things have happened since that day that I just want to say

Simone:

thank you for and my name is Simone.

Simone:

I am a type one diabetic.

Simone:th,:Simone:

So I've been diabetic for 24 years.

Simone:

I was diagnosed at the age of 13 years old.

Simone:

so it's been, it's been a long journey.

Simone:

I must say a lot of things have changed over the years.

Simone:

So always something new coming out.

Simone:

I'm always excited about that.

Simone:

I am also a registered nurse.

Simone:

I've been a nurse for over 10 years.

Simone:

I generally work with just pediatrics.

Simone:

I've worked at two children's hospitals and I am in the Texas area

Simone:

somewhere between Dallas and Houston.

Simone:

I'm always in one of those two cities my greatest passion would

Simone:

be, I'll just love helping people.

Simone:

when I was younger, I, I don't know.

Simone:

I had this fascination with homeless people and I told my mom, I always

Simone:

wanted to start like a homeless shelter or center or something.

Simone:

So I get to cover that passion by volunteering with my church.

Simone:

Cause they do a lot of events

Simone:

with homeless people.

Simone:

But also when I was diagnosed with diabetes at the age of 13, I then

Simone:

became so fascinated with medicine and just trying to learn everything

Simone:

that I could about diabetes.

Simone:

I had a very, very good team when I was first originally diagnosed.

Simone:

So they made it maybe, I mean, it's still was a hard transition

Simone:

to find out you're a diabetic, but.

Simone:

They kind of eased it for me because I had such a great support system.

Simone:

So in my past time, what I love to do is travel.

Simone:

I love to travel the world.

Simone:

I did not let diabetes stop me.

Simone:

I've gone to New Zealand by myself.

Simone:

I am always looking for the next adrenaline rush.

Simone:

I climbed a bridge in New Zealand and that was my heart was pumping.

Simone:

My blood sugar stayed normal, but it was just, something great to do.

Simone:

I love the beach.

Simone:

If I could sit on a beach every day, at some point I'm going to

Simone:

live on a beach, but for right now, I live in the real world and.

Simone:

No, not living on the beach, just living regular city life.

Simone:

And then I love to read that I'm not a TV person.

Simone:

I can sit and read books all day.

Simone:

I have so many books, I just got a couple of new diabetes books.

Simone:

and I read about everything into science.

Simone:

not necessarily always medical books, just whatever I can get my hands on.

Simone:

That gets my attention long enough.

Simone:

I'll sit and read and forget that I'm supposed to go to sleep.

Simone:

That's really me.

Taylor:

we call that bell life, when she was, when she was just walking

Taylor:

around everywhere and didn't, she just happened to navigate, I used to

Taylor:

do that in high school all the time, and it would freak my parents out

Taylor:

because they were like the TV's on.

Taylor:

And she's sitting at the kitchen table reading.

Taylor:

What happened to our kid who, who did something to our kid?

Taylor:

Cause she doesn't, she doesn't ignore the TV except for when I'm in a good book.

Taylor:

And you bring up something that I'm trying to work my way back in

Taylor:

because I will ball out in Barnes and Nobles or half price books.

Taylor:

Like I will at a makeup store.

Taylor:

And my partner is like, you don't need more books because you haven't

Taylor:

finished reading the other ones.

Taylor:

I'm like, I need a library in my house and shut up.

Taylor:

This is what I want.

Taylor:

I want a library in my house.

Taylor:

it is a, a dream of mine that is going to happen with the

Taylor:

ladder, it's going to happen.

Taylor:

So anyhow,

Simone:

That's why I know we are soul sisters because you brought up bale.

Simone:

I love that's my favorite Disney movie.

Simone:

And I've told people so many times that who ever my Prince charming is he is

Simone:

going to surprise me with the library.

Simone:

And I'm going to just sit and go and read books all day.

Simone:

So I'm just waiting for my beauty and the beast library it's coming.

Simone:

I know it's coming.

Taylor:

Yeah.

Taylor:

That's, that's that I really feel like that's half of what men don't get

Taylor:

about women sometimes is books are like lifeblood necessities for us because,

Taylor:

and I think it's a little bit of a historical thing of not being allowed

Taylor:

to be educated and things like that.

Taylor:

So it's just like nine times out of 10, you take it to a bookstore.

Taylor:

You tell you you're going to get a library for her.

Taylor:

She's down.

Taylor:

Like, just test that.

Taylor:

And if not, cause I know that there's some that aren't, but.

Taylor:

You never know.

Taylor:

That's awesome.

Taylor:

Well, I would love to know, and I feel like I say this every episode,

Taylor:

but you never know who might just be listening for the first time.

Taylor:

I love to ask my non-diabetic guests and then my diabetic guest, one

Taylor:

question pertaining to something that they want to myth bust.

Taylor:

So for my diabetic friends, I like to ask what's one misconception

Taylor:

about being a diabetic that you want people to know is incorrect.

Taylor:

Stop the madness.

Taylor:

We're shutting it down right now.

Taylor:

This thing is wrong.

Taylor:

Stop spreading the madness.

Taylor:

What's that one thing.

Simone:

that is such a good question.

Simone:

There are so many, I, especially traveling.

Simone:

I have, I've had so many different things come up or, people see my devices.

Simone:

What is that?

Simone:

But I think even 24 years in the biggest one for me is I

Simone:

can eat whatever I want to eat.

Simone:

I can still get that.

Simone:

I mean, family, friends, new people, especially now that they see, okay,

Simone:

they see my insulin pump, they see my continuous glucose monitor.

Simone:

Some people are, they'll come up and they'll ask me about it, which I love.

Simone:

But the thing is it's like people will ask me.

Simone:

I'm more than willing to talk about my diabetes to tell you what it is.

Simone:

My thing is after the fact they're like, Oh, well, can you eat that?

Simone:

But should you be eating that?

Simone:

Well, I don't think you should have that.

Simone:

And it never ends it.

Simone:

It's always there.

Simone:

I mean, some of my family they've gotten better with it over the years

Simone:

cause they realize just like I told everybody that I talk to, I can have

Simone:

anything I want, as long as I know, you know how to manage my diabetes.

Simone:

If I want to eat a bowl of cereal, maybe I have a pre

Simone:

bolus because that bowl is here.

Simone:

I love cereal.

Simone:

Like cereal was my thing in high school or mama.

Simone:

My mom was like, is this girl only going to eat?

Simone:

You're diabetic.

Simone:

You can't only eat cereal, but I love cereal.

Simone:

And I don't want to feel like I can't eat it.

Simone:

I cereal hole.

Simone:

It's like all of the fruity ones were my favorite.

Simone:

And so.

Simone:

I just want, non-diabetics, I want diabetics that struggle

Simone:

with this to know you can have anything you want in moderation.

Simone:

It's figuring out how to work it in your diet.

Simone:

Maybe there's a certain time of day.

Simone:

You should eat it.

Simone:

Maybe you need a pre-bolus but just don't everybody.

Simone:

Can you eat that?

Simone:

My ears plugged my ears because that question never ends.

Taylor:

turning around on people.

Taylor:

Just give them my back, like, okay, let's start again.

Taylor:

What was your question?

Taylor:

And then just keep doing it, like, like you're training.

Taylor:

Like every time that you asked me this really ridiculous question,

Taylor:

I'm gonna keep turning my back on you until you understand.

Taylor:

This is not the question to ask me.

Simone:

He asked to just fill my mouth up with whatever I'm eating.

Simone:

So what did you say?

Simone:

So, yes.

Taylor:

Man.

Taylor:

That is, that is so funny.

Taylor:

Yeah.

Taylor:

I think the the, should you have that, or even in Facebook groups where

Taylor:

they're like ripping people apart when they post their meals or whatever, and

Taylor:

it's just like, okay, don't be mad.

Taylor:

Cause that might not be your setup.

Taylor:

Like, can you not tell people you're doing too much this too much that

Taylor:

now some people are asking for it.

Taylor:

So they're like, what am I doing wrong?

Taylor:

But I feel like Facebook groups is such, such murky water to be in, to

Taylor:

ask about a very personal experience.

Taylor:

And so, I clearly have a thing with Facebook groups.

Taylor:

I'm I refuse to start when, if, if you're listening right now as much as I

Taylor:

want to show community, I will tell you right now it will never be on Facebook.

Taylor:

Yeah.

Simone:

And I'm in, I'm in several Facebook groups.

Simone:

And like you said, the read questions, I try to answer ones, when I can,

Simone:

but I read some of those answers and I'm just like, you should, I don't

Simone:

feel like anyone should ever be shamed and you just, you just never

Simone:

know what anybody's going through.

Simone:

Like, I could be on my diet and stay great.

Simone:

24 seven for the most part.

Simone:

And then there's like one day, maybe I just, I need a break.

Simone:

I need a treat.

Simone:

I want to enjoy something.

Simone:

And I don't want to feel like anybody is going to shame me because today I decided

Simone:

to, at my favorite sprinkles, I'll get the sugar-free red velvet cupcake, but I know,

Simone:

they're like, Oh, you're having a cupcake.

Simone:

Yes.

Simone:

I'm having a cupcake it's for me.

Simone:

So I totally understand you with those Facebook groups.

Taylor:

Tense man.

Taylor:

Like I just wanted a fucking doughnut.

Taylor:

Okay.

Taylor:

Can I just have a donut?

Taylor:

I didn't order a whole dozen, right?

Taylor:

My business.

Taylor:

Spiny of donut shit.

Taylor:

I would love to dig a little bit into what inspired your career,

Taylor:

because you definitely have a heart of gold and wanting to help people.

Taylor:

and I love how you said, like your medical team was really influential.

Taylor:

did you, did you want to be a nurse before you were diagnosed?

Taylor:

Or how did you fall into the idea of like, you know what I'm going

Taylor:

to pursue a career in, in a medical field and specifically nursing.

Taylor:

Cause I know some people really want to be doctors and some people are

Taylor:

like, no, I'm cool being a nurse.

Taylor:

So I love to, to learn more about how you got into that.

Simone:

Okay, so fires.

Simone:

No, I never, never, never, never.

Simone:

Before the age of 13 thought about a medical career I actually wanted

Simone:

to follow in my father's footsteps.

Simone:

He is a computer technician.

Simone:

I've had a computer since I was little.

Simone:

I absolutely love technology.

Simone:

So.

Simone:

That's what I was going to be.

Simone:

I really didn't understand what computer technician meant, but if you looked at

Simone:

anything that I wrote out or are you going to be, when you grow up a computer

Simone:

technician and then diabetes came.

Simone:

And so it really wasn't even the initial.

Simone:

I went to the hospital and I had those few days there with the medical team.

Simone:

It was over time, kind of the educators.

Simone:

I may I went to diabetes camp my first summer of having diabetes

Simone:

and they just, I don't know, they just poured so much into me.

Simone:

And what I figured out over time is, Hey, I want to be that for somebody else.

Simone:

And I know for me, it was hard to, there were times where it was hard to

Simone:

listen to the medical professionals who.

Simone:

they know the science of it, they read about it, but they

Simone:

don't live it every day.

Simone:

They don't know what it's like to really live with this.

Simone:

they, they tell you to do certain things and I'm just like, that's not realistic.

Simone:

I mean, maybe sometimes I can do it that way, but in my everyday

Simone:

life, that doesn't work for me.

Simone:

And I go through this, I live with this.

Simone:

So I just wanted to be that nurse for somebody else.

Simone:

Now I know you said it talked about the doctor.

Simone:

I don't want to be a doctor somehow in there it became an OB

Simone:

GYN instead of an endocrinologist.

Simone:

I don't know why, but we got past that and we kind of like, no, that's

Simone:

not what we're supposed to be doing.

Simone:

I feel like even the times where I thought that I wanted to do something else,

Simone:

I always come back to this no matter what, I always come back to diabetes.

Simone:

So.

Simone:

It's it's really a passion for me.

Simone:

It's really in my heart.

Simone:

It's really the reason I became a nurse.

Simone:

I met so many families where, when I was a diabetes educator for the hospital,

Simone:

the parents will be like, look at her.

Simone:

She's a diabetic, she's a nurse.

Simone:

it made me feel good too.

Simone:

They're like, she doesn't have anything she's normal.

Simone:

And she lives every day and we would have conversations and the families were just

Simone:

so excited to know that I had diabetes Sue and I'm teaching them about diabetes.

Simone:

So it's always been there, but really, since my diagnosis,

Taylor:

Wow.

Taylor:

Wow.

Taylor:

you, you slid right into my next question because, I can imagine

Taylor:

being a healthcare worker also a diabetic and you work with kids.

Taylor:

Right.

Taylor:

and so I could absolutely see how that would be.

Taylor:

So life changing to see that the person that is helping you is also in the

Taylor:

same shoes as you and you, you have something to look forward to, because

Taylor:

I think, it's one of those setups where we connect so much better with what

Taylor:

we know with what's familiar, right?

Taylor:

We're humans, we've shown that pattern over and over and over again, if

Taylor:

I can relate to you in some kind of way, It makes me feel good.

Taylor:

It makes me want to trust you.

Taylor:

but I can imagine there was also some challenges as well with having

Taylor:

your diagnosis and having to work in a medical space all the time.

Taylor:

So I'm curious to know, like, what were those challenges and

Taylor:

how did you get through them?

Taylor:

And what advice would you give to other, medical workers who were

Taylor:

working with similar conditions?

Taylor:

If not the same.

Simone:

I'm going to start with my initial.

Simone:

Going into a hospital.

Simone:

it kinda depends on your position, but I feel like nurses, doctors, they

Simone:

work sometimes they work 24 hours.

Simone:

So this could be something that affects them too.

Simone:

But for me, the initial nursing positions, or actually I went in as a nursing

Simone:

assistant, but the positions that were open were only night positions.

Simone:

And so my endocrinology, she was very reluctant when I told

Simone:

her I went from a nine to five.

Simone:

I was a stockbroker before I worked at the hospital.

Simone:

So I'm working a regular Monday through Friday nine to five job.

Simone:

And then I told my doctor, Hey, I'm about to go back to school for nursing.

Simone:

I'm going into a three 12 hour, night shift a week.

Simone:

And she was like, I don't think it's going to work, but we'll see.

Simone:

And so honestly, going in, I lasted six weeks and my blood sugars were.

Simone:

All over the place.

Simone:

So I went from being in control to quickly being out of control.

Simone:

I wasn't getting enough sleep.

Simone:

My body was trying to figure out, okay, you're up all night?

Simone:

What are you doing?

Simone:

checking at different times now I'm eating at different times.

Simone:

And so I ended up, luckily they worked with me and they let

Simone:

me switch to a day position.

Simone:

And then two years later, once I became a nurse, I went back into

Simone:

the same situation because as a new nurse, I had to take a night position.

Simone:

They didn't have any day positions.

Simone:

and, but the second time it was different because I was prepared.

Simone:

I feel like you can do any and everything.

Simone:

When you're prepared, I was prepared for it.

Simone:

I knew months in advance that this was going to be the case.

Simone:

It was kind of like, what do I need to know?

Simone:

And what do I need to do to figure out?

Simone:

So, because I had went through the experience before I wasn't ready

Simone:

this time, we focused on, okay, we need to have set times where you eat.

Simone:

Maybe I was like getting up during the day to also make sure I was still having

Simone:

food or in the days where I was sleeping.

Simone:

making sure that at that point, I believe I was on like a

Simone:

continuous glucose monitor.

Simone:

So that totally changed the way I was doing things.

Simone:

, yes.

Simone:

That was like, The best new device I could ever have.

Simone:

I struggled with night times, and there were nights where I was so

Simone:

busy working that I wouldn't stop for a second to have a drink, like,

Simone:

okay, you can't be dehydrated all night and taking care of people.

Simone:

So the hardest thing for me was figuring out my diabetes, but it

Simone:

definitely worked when I went in the second time and I was prepared for it.

Simone:

I had a plan.

Simone:

I had alternatives to, if that didn't work, then I could try this.

Simone:

And I honestly worked as a night nurse for almost six years.

Simone:

I prefer nights I didn't.

Simone:

Yeah.

Simone:

I was able to control my blood sugar.

Simone:

So my advice to any, any healthcare workers is anybody in diabetes with

Simone:

diabetes who is going in a job where it's like a night job, just being prepared,

Simone:

knowing the things to look out for.

Simone:

Knowing, you know how your diabetes works.

Simone:

If there are certain times where you, maybe you do need to have a snack during

Simone:

the day, cause your blood sugars are dropping, you're sleeping during the day.

Simone:

Now just knowing those things and you can get through it with preparation.

Taylor:

Yeah.

Taylor:

Yeah.

Taylor:

Wow.

Taylor:

That's really interesting because when I was first diagnosed,

Taylor:

I was in a night job as well.

Taylor:

And I was working with the Australia New Zealand market at Apple.

Taylor:

So I was there when the iPhone six, the Apple watch, all of that came out.

Taylor:

And my, my training class actually watched that guy in Australia who

Taylor:

dropped his phone on national television.

Taylor:

He was the first one to get his iPhone six and he dropped it.

Taylor:

We watched it live because we were on their time schedule.

Taylor:

And so my schedule was typically three to midnight or four to one because we

Taylor:

dealt with double daylight savings time.

Taylor:

We dealt with daylight savings time here in the U S and then daylight

Taylor:

savings time for Australia, New Zealand.

Taylor:

So everybody wanted the, like two to 11 shift because it was like,

Taylor:

okay, that's not, it's, it's still got plenty of time during the

Taylor:

day, but you're not up all night.

Taylor:

And then there was the most of us who were three to 12, and then we

Taylor:

shifted that meant four to one.

Taylor:

And then if it shifted again, five to two, right?

Taylor:

So you were, you were out and so.

Taylor:

I did not land the two to 11, no matter how hard I tried.

Taylor:

And I was experiencing my crazy symptoms during this time.

Taylor:

and so passing out the crazy thirst, the lethargic, like, I feel like

Taylor:

I'm just walking through mud all the time, just tired all the time.

Taylor:

Can't sleep through the night because my mouth is so dry and sticky.

Taylor:

And so I started to miss work and I was a temp for Apple.

Taylor:

So I really had to be on it because you know that they got that six

Taylor:

strike rule and you're, you're done.

Taylor:

And, it's, it's insane.

Taylor:

So I kept going to the doctor, kept going to the doctor.

Taylor:

And when I finally was diagnosed, I, I was already out the door, from

Taylor:

that position, there was nothing I could do to come back from it.

Taylor:

Now, thankfully, they had a rule with the temp agency that you when you finish a

Taylor:

contract, you can go back after 90 days.

Taylor:

And so I did eventually go back and I had to get a medical accommodation

Taylor:

because that's when I started Metformin, which just tore everything up.

Taylor:

Like everything.

Taylor:

Like, I, I, I'm not going to want to see new diabetics, like

Taylor:

they put me on and I'm like, dear God, I hope, I hope you don't go.

Taylor:

What I went through.

Taylor:

It's bad, Mexican night, every night for like the first two weeks, or at least

Taylor:

that was, for me, it was terrible yet.

Taylor:

It caused so much stomach stuff.

Taylor:

no vomiting, no vomiting.

Taylor:

Just, I I couldn't feel my legs for, for two weeks.

Taylor:

We'll just leave it at that.

Taylor:

And so, yeah, having to get a medical accommodation to go to the bathroom all

Taylor:

the time, but I finally looked up and I got a 7:00 AM shift and everything

Taylor:

just suddenly just went so much smoother because I, I couldn't sleep well.

Taylor:

my numbers were all over the place on top of, I was in denial my first

Taylor:

two years as, as a baby diabetic.

Taylor:

So I wasn't taking my medication consistently.

Taylor:

I was like, what?

Taylor:

Because it was just jacking my stomach up all the time.

Taylor:

And then I'm like, Oh, well I can do this with just food and exercise alone.

Taylor:

I'm like, no, you can't, you weren't doing it before you were diagnosed.

Taylor:

Like stop the madness.

Taylor:

So it, it, those night jobs are more power to you because it really

Taylor:

can be really heavy on your body.

Taylor:

If you're not prepared, It can be so heavy.

Taylor:

And that leads me to my next question, but I'm really excited about, because.

Taylor:

I did not get diabetes education for all of the ODI diabetics.

Taylor:

I'm sure this, that when you are first diagnosed, typically your doctor

Taylor:

tells you, or your endocrinologist tells you that you need to attend

Taylor:

some form of diabetes education.

Taylor:

Course it's like night school for diabetes.

Taylor:

Right.

Taylor:

And I do recall, I do recall my doctor telling me this.

Taylor:

I remember going home with a pamphlet and some papers and stuff like that.

Taylor:

I wasn't quite clear on, do I schedule this?

Taylor:

Do you schedule this?

Taylor:

When does this happen?

Taylor:

Right.

Taylor:

So six years later and I still haven't had it.

Taylor:

And, Simone being a diabetes educator, I asked her if she would be willing

Taylor:

to use me as a Guinea pig for what an education meeting would be like.

Taylor:

Excuse me with her using me as a brand new type two diabetic.

Taylor:

I'm just going to pretend like I'm doing all the things that I was doing

Taylor:

when I was first diagnosed, which was not anything you're supposed to do.

Simone:

Yes, anything you're supposed to do.

Simone:

So, I have prepared a basic going to be basic diabetes education.

Simone:

we'll keep it simple.

Simone:

The biggest thing about when you're going into diabetes education, especially

Simone:

as a new diabetic, the diagnosis is self is already so overwhelming.

Simone:

I remember like, wait, what?

Simone:

No, I have to give myself shot and, or this medicine or.

Simone:

There's so many thoughts already going into your mind and into your head.

Simone:

And you're, you're trying not to overthink everything.

Simone:

So I feel like a lot of the programs try to keep it really basic because

Simone:

especially now there's so much technology and devices and what we try to do is

Simone:

have other classes, okay, now that you've gone through the basics, now

Simone:

we can go into what is a continuous glucose monitor or CGM, possibly talk

Simone:

about pumps depending on what your doctor is talking about with you.

Simone:

So we kind of keep all of that for later discussions.

Simone:

basic education generally starts with what is diabetes.

Simone:

It means, you have too much sugar.

Simone:

In your blood.

Simone:

What happens is a lot of times with type one diabetes or with type one

Simone:

diabetes, your body stops producing the insulin that you need to help

Simone:

that sugar get into the cell.

Simone:

So usually what insulin does is it, they kind of talk about the locking

Simone:

key, the, the insulin and the sugar blush the sugar in your blood, they

Simone:

connect and they go into your cells and they provide your body with energy.

Simone:

So with type one, you don't have that insulin with type two.

Simone:

You have maybe some more insulin resistance.

Simone:

So you would have things like maybe you're not producing enough insulin or

Simone:

the insulin that you're producing is not the right combination to get that in

Simone:

the energy that you need, or to get that sugar into your sales for that energy.

Simone:

So that's pretty much what diabetes is.

Simone:

And when you're asked to poke your finger, you're checking for the amount

Simone:

of sugar that's still in your blood.

Simone:

So with type one, Generally for the most part, you're going to be on insulin.

Simone:

I have, I've met one type one at camp and she was on diet because

Simone:

they caught it early enough, but they told her at some point she

Simone:

would be on insulin with type two.

Simone:

Didn't really the options going to be diet, exercise.

Simone:

you could also be on oral medication or even insulin.

Simone:

So that's kind of the basics.

Simone:

Yes.

Simone:

Ma'am.

Simone:

Oh, that's you?

Simone:

I was like, where are you raising your hand?

Simone:

You have a question.

Taylor:

we were on, on oral medication and that's me.

Simone:

Yes.

Simone:

And like you said, the oral medications, you just, you, you have to make sure that.

Simone:

I know a lot of people don't like to read them, but those pamphlets that

Simone:

come with your medication, reading those side effects, those commercials, you

Simone:

see that say these are the side effects.

Simone:

You need to know those because those are generally going to be reasons that you

Simone:

would be calling your healthcare providers to say, Hey, I'm going through this.

Simone:

What what's going on?

Simone:

Sometimes they'll say, okay, in the beginning, you'll have that.

Simone:

It'll, it should last a few weeks.

Simone:

But after this amount of time, if you're still having that,

Simone:

then it becomes a problem.

Simone:

So with diabetes, generally, the signs and symptoms, they call

Simone:

them the three-piece, which Taylor has talked about earlier today.

Simone:

So they are polydipsia, polyuria and polyphagia, and those are

Simone:

excessive thirst, excessive, hunger, and excessive urination.

Simone:

And so a lot of times I've even had like families, especially of younger children

Simone:

where they all of a sudden wet the bed.

Simone:

And that can be a sign of many things, but one of them could be diabetes.

Simone:

they haven't wet the bed in a long time.

Simone:

They've gotten to this point where they're so thirsty and they're

Simone:

going to the bathroom all the time.

Simone:

And then they all of a sudden have an accident.

Simone:

And then we're finding diabetes.

Simone:

So just knowing the signs and symptoms now, also, now being

Simone:

diagnosed as a diabetic, no, that those same symptoms could be a

Simone:

sign that your blood sugars high.

Simone:

When you're having high blood sugar, you're going to go to

Simone:

the bathroom all the time.

Simone:

You're going to want to drink all the time.

Simone:

you're gonna want to eat all the time.

Simone:

He may have blurry vision.

Simone:

Some people notice when they're first diagnosed, Hey, I'm

Simone:

having trouble reading things.

Simone:

I'm having trouble seeing things.

Simone:

That's another sign that you may have diabetes or that your blood

Simone:

sugars high sometimes also like numbness and tingling in your feet.

Simone:

Foot care is going to be a part of your daily taking care of yourself.

Simone:

So the day-to-day of diabetes is going to be checking your blood sugar

Simone:

and that'll depend on your doctor.

Simone:

type two.

Simone:

Sometimes they only have you check the fasting blood sugar in the

Simone:

morning type ones generally are checking their blood sugars before

Simone:

each meal and before bedtime.

Simone:

but.

Simone:

They should give you a plan that says, okay, this is how often we would like

Simone:

for you to check your blood sugar.

Simone:

These are the times that you should be taking your medicine and you want

Simone:

to kind of stick to the same time.

Simone:

So if you take, if you're on Metformin and you take it every day in the

Simone:

morning, Try to take it around the same time every day to kind of help with

Simone:

keeping those blood sugars more steady.

Simone:

Then there comes a with testing your blood sugar, how to test

Simone:

your blood sugar correctly.

Simone:

Now I have some people who think they should, they might start eating and

Simone:

they have food on their fingers, or they haven't stopped to wash their hands.

Simone:

They haven't used an alcohol swab to clean their fingers, and then

Simone:

they get this crazy blood sugar and they're like, well, I feel okay.

Simone:

And I haven't been as high.

Simone:

I haven't been going to the bathroom or had any symptoms.

Simone:

And I'm just like, what did you just clean your finger before you started?

Simone:

It could be as simple as washing your hands, washing your hands with soap

Simone:

and water or using those alcohol swaps and remembering to allow the alcohol.

Simone:

To dry before you poke your finger.

Simone:

That's also something I feel like I always have to remind people of.

Simone:

and then when you're poking your finger, you want to stick

Simone:

to the sides of your finger.

Simone:

So if you're here, you're going to go kind of not right in the middle.

Simone:

You want to go kind of off to the sides of your finger.

Simone:

It's a little more sensitive in the middle of your finger.

Simone:

And over time, a lot of people start to have that issue with the dexterity

Simone:

of their fingers because they're poking your you're poking your finger so much.

Simone:

So that's when you know, continuous glucose monitors come in and help

Simone:

with things like that because you're not having to poke your finger.

Simone:

also with the day-to-day of diabetes is going to be.

Simone:

Trying to get in some exercise, 30 to 60 minutes a day, a 30

Simone:

minute walk most days of the week.

Simone:

So five, six days a week.

Simone:

If you can, if you're new to exercise, you're going to want to be careful

Simone:

because some people start off and they just go run in and their blood sugar

Simone:

goes down or goes up depending on where it was when he started, depending on

Simone:

what type of exercise you're knowing.

Simone:

So you want to make sure that, if you're new to it, I would say,

Simone:

try a five, 10 minute walk three times a day versus trying to do

Simone:

the full 30 minutes at one time.

Simone:

But also being mindful whenever, no matter what, no matter when it is,

Simone:

no matter what the feelings are.

Simone:

I generally tell my diabetics, if you fell off, check your blood sugar,

Simone:

it's a simple thing you can easily do.

Simone:

You can go ahead and check it.

Simone:

And if it's normal, you can say, okay, it's not my blood sugar.

Simone:

It's something else.

Simone:

So, if you start to feel off check your blood sugar also, when you're working

Simone:

out exercising, especially if you're away from home or even in your car,

Simone:

you'll want to have some type of juice.

Simone:

hard candy.

Simone:

The glucose have.

Simone:

Now I personally don't like the glucose tabs.

Simone:

They're a little chalky, but I have noticed,

Simone:

I have noticed that my guys love to carry them because they're easy for

Simone:

them to just put in their pocket.

Simone:

So I've talked to a few guys and they're like, I'll deal with the chalky because

Simone:

I can easily put this in my pocket.

Simone:

So I'm like, okay, now me, I have boxes of juice in my car.

Simone:

I keep candy in my purse.

Simone:

And the rule of thumb is have 15 grams of carbs.

Simone:

so it's the rule of 15 is have, when you are a blood sugars below 70, you're

Simone:

going to have 15 grams of carbohydrates.

Simone:

You're going to wait 15 minutes and recheck.

Simone:

Now I'm going to tell you personally, that was one of the hardest rules for me

Simone:

to discuss with my families as a nurse.

Simone:

I feel like everybody is different.

Simone:

The rule of 15 may not work for everyone.

Simone:

you have to find what works for you for me.

Simone:

Sometimes it's as simple as.

Simone:

10 grams of something, depending on what I'm having.

Simone:

Sometimes I need a little more and I also want to tell you cause this was another

Simone:

thing that was hard for me when explaining to families and having to let them know.

Simone:

There's been times where I have low blood sugars and it, it really puts

Simone:

your body into starvation mode.

Simone:

And I want to eat the whole kitchen.

Simone:

I laugh at those means that are like the, all the cabinets are open the

Simone:

diabetic cat, the low blood sugar.

Simone:

And they're trying to eat the whole kitchen because that's

Simone:

made me I've, I've been there.

Simone:

I know it, it feels like I'm like, Oh, but I'm starving or I have it.

Simone:

And then your body is like, no, you didn't have enough.

Simone:

And you're waiting.

Simone:

And I feel like, especially with having my continuous glucose monitor, I'm constantly

Simone:

like, wait, wait, it didn't go up yet.

Simone:

it's only been five minutes.

Simone:

It changes every five minutes.

Simone:

So.

Simone:

It's really going to be about figuring out what works for you.

Simone:

in later education, we can discuss different ways to test

Simone:

and find out what works for you.

Simone:

finding out what foods affect your blood sugars in a certain way,

Simone:

finding out what times of the day.

Simone:

Maybe you should have less carbs.

Simone:

And then if you want to have more, you can eat them later in the day,

Simone:

depending on what works for you.

Simone:

so then the next biggest thing for the day to day is going to be diet watching

Simone:

what you eat now, your carbohydrate amount is generally going to be based

Simone:

on what you discuss with your doctor.

Simone:

They're all there.

Simone:

There's so many options out there.

Simone:

I mean, A lot of the regular rates of doctors are going to say for me, and

Simone:

from all of the things I've read is generally, 15 to 20 gram carbs, snack,

Simone:

30 to 45 grams of carbs per meal.

Simone:

And so, and you want to like your nighttime meal, you're going to want

Simone:

to make sure to kind of add some protein in with that meal to help

Simone:

sustain your blood sugars overnight.

Simone:

So different people try different things.

Simone:

You're going to hear everything out there.

Simone:

I know diabetics who are on keto diet.

Simone:

I know diabetics who do low carb.

Simone:

I know diabetics who do plant-based, which is a lot.

Simone:

Like a lot of carbs when, when you're doing plant-based diets.

Simone:

So in the beginning, keep it simple.

Simone:

We need to figure out what works for you, but eventually you may

Simone:

end up trying something else and finding that it does work for you.

Simone:

And it does help with you not having that rollercoaster of blood sugar, ups and

Simone:

downs, and depending on what you eat.

Simone:

So those are the main things that you're going to want to keep an eye on.

Simone:

also just knowing the signs and symptoms of low blood sugar.

Simone:

So you may feel shaky.

Simone:

You may feel I get sweaty when my blood sugar is low.

Simone:

again, feeling like I am starving, sometimes I'm confused.

Simone:

Sometimes I am irritable.

Simone:

and then, Oh, like, yes, my heart is beating out of my chest.

Simone:

I'm like, what is it?

Simone:

Slow down, calm down.

Simone:

It's okay.

Simone:

So, when you.

Simone:

Like I said, if you start feeling that way, check your blood sugar

Simone:

check to make sure the best thing you can always do is check.

Simone:

I know a lot of diabetics as they get older, they of like,

Simone:

Oh, I feel a certain way.

Simone:

I just still say, check your blood sugar.

Simone:

Cause you never know something else could always be going on with you.

Simone:

And that could be why you feel that way.

Simone:

and then, so understanding complications with diabetes, especially with type

Simone:

two, even type one, you want to be careful watching your blood pressure.

Simone:

You want to watch your cholesterol.

Simone:

You want your bad cholesterol to be under 100.

Simone:

You want generally once your blood pressure to be like under,

Simone:

I want to say one 30 over 80.

Simone:

so those are the ABCs of diabetes.

Simone:

So a is going to be your hemoglobin A1C.

Simone:

You've probably heard your doctor, doctor talk about some tests.

Simone:

I've had people telling me that they're like, I was told some tests and my

Simone:

blood sugar is supposed to be, it's supposed to be under a 70, that test.

Simone:

I'm like, yes, that's your hemoglobin A1C.

Simone:

so they generally, for as a diabetic, they.

Simone:

Showing control.

Simone:

They want you to be under seven, starting to see some other ways where

Simone:

people are just focusing on their time in range of the blood sugar, where

Simone:

they're, where they're supposed to be.

Simone:

as far as what their doctor has said, they want their blood sugars to be so generally

Simone:

before meals, they'll tell you, they want you to be about a hundred to 130.

Simone:

If you're checking two hours after a meal is going to, you want to be under one

Simone:

80 is generally a good rule of thumb.

Simone:

So with that, it's keeping your blood sugar steady and within range, watching

Simone:

your blood pressure, keeping your cholesterol good, should hopefully help

Simone:

in the fight to prevent complications.

Simone:

So basic complications Vision vision problems.

Simone:

I want to say that diabetes is in the top up there for causes of blindness.

Simone:

and then when I was talking about foot care, you have to

Simone:

check your feet every day.

Simone:

You, you must check in between your toes, making sure that when you get out of

Simone:

the tub or the shower dry between your feet, you want to keep that dry because.

Simone:

So many issues happening with like foot officers getting a cut and because of

Simone:

your diabetes, you're not getting as much circulation down to your feet.

Simone:

And so the wound is not healing as it should.

Simone:

So you just want to keep an eye out for that.

Simone:

I'm known some, some older diabetics that I've met, who couldn't feel their

Simone:

feet and they stepped on something and didn't even know they stepped on a nail

Simone:

or a screw or, Thumbtack or anything.

Simone:

And it's just like that, that feeling is not there.

Simone:

So you definitely, day-to-day keeping up with your Things that

Simone:

can affect your blood sugars outside of just what you eat stress.

Simone:

So keeping your stress down any way that you can can help you with

Simone:

maintaining your blood sugars and in the, in range that you wanted to be

Simone:

also illness, when you're sick, you need to be prepared for a sick day.

Simone:

So remembering that, if you're sick and your blood sugars are higher,

Simone:

that means you need more fluids.

Simone:

You may need to have some correction.

Simone:

So you should have, if you're on like insulin, your Dr.

Simone:

May have you on some type of correction.

Simone:

sometimes with type two diabetes, they will have you like, maybe

Simone:

you're on a medication and you only have a correction when you're high.

Simone:

Things like that.

Simone:

So some people do both.

Simone:

They, they really don't have to take insulin on a day to day, but they may

Simone:

use it for a correction if needed.

Simone:

but like if you're just on the pill just on diet.

Simone:

So it's going to be making sure, especially if you're vomiting that

Simone:

you are maintaining your blood sugar, so maybe you may have to drink

Simone:

like some seven notes, something that'll keep your blood sugar up.

Simone:

But because you're vomiting, it's easier to keep seven up down than trying to eat

Simone:

something that has carbohydrates in it.

Simone:

And also, remembering to reach out to your doctor, if you're having any

Simone:

type of illness, you're seeing that your blood sugars are off always

Simone:

call your healthcare provider.

Simone:

And then especially with when you get to a point where a lot of times

Simone:

they'll tell you if your blood sugar is over two 50, they'll have you

Simone:

check your urine ketones at home.

Simone:

If you have ketones.

Simone:

That's always a reason to call your doctor.

Simone:

So, just, those are kind of the basics of if I was giving you a

Simone:

plain simple to the point day-to-day diabetes that's what it would be.

Taylor:

man.

Taylor:

I, I definitely, didn't get that at all.

Taylor:

I, I will say, my dad was helpful and letting me know different

Taylor:

things, especially stuff that, they don't always fully tell you in a

Taylor:

doctor's office, but he was really good at like explaining stuff to me.

Taylor:

one, I do have a question about the exercise thing and it's because I

Taylor:

experienced this this morning and I was really confused because I have

Taylor:

been using the Oculus quest and an app called supernatural to get my cardio in,

Taylor:

because my endocrinologist said four to five times a week, 30 minutes of cardio.

Taylor:

And all I hear when someone says that is running.

Taylor:

Or some type of elliptical or some type of, a hit workout where I got

Taylor:

to do what what's that shit called?

Taylor:

Oh, where you gotta like get down on the ground and get back up and jump.

Taylor:

And burpees.

Taylor:

I two burpees with a passion and I love using these few, excuse me, my knee.

Taylor:

And now, my shoulder, but I'm like my knee, I can't handle that.

Taylor:

I need low impact.

Taylor:

That's not low back.

Taylor:

So, that's, that's what it makes me think of.

Taylor:

But in reality, it's I need to get my heart rate up and I need to keep

Taylor:

it up for a certain amount of time.

Taylor:

And Jim has been hard for me, even though I've joined back because it's still

Taylor:

like weird, I'm just like, eh and so as much as I like weights, I'm not getting

Taylor:

enough of my heart rate up to ensure that I'm I'm, keeping my blood sugars even.

Taylor:

So my question this morning, I did my 30 minutes and I was very proud of myself.

Taylor:

I was sweating.

Taylor:

It was a good workout.

Taylor:

They play like all the songs.

Taylor:

It was like a Cardi B Nicki Minaj, Megan stallion mix.

Taylor:

And I was all for, it felt very powered.

Taylor:

And then my CGM alarm is going off throughout the session.

Taylor:

Mind you, I checked before I got out of bed.

Taylor:

And I know that there's the whole like feet to the floor

Taylor:

thing, but like I was in range.

Taylor:

I was like 70 to like a hundred.

Taylor:

Right.

Taylor:

And then after my workout, I was like one 80 something.

Taylor:

I even did my finger prick and I haven't pricked my finger and a

Taylor:

month and a half since I got my CGM.

Taylor:

And I was very happy about that.

Taylor:

And it was like two 40 and I'm like, what the hell is going on?

Taylor:

I just worked out

Simone:

So, and I'm thinking what I'm saying, that is an example

Simone:

of you do everything right.

Simone:

And your blood sugar decides otherwise, I'm going to tell you this, you can

Simone:

do two days in a row and, and you you're like, I did this, I did it.

Simone:

I've had those times because usually for me, and you said you had all the

Simone:

music, you got me going on me here.

Simone:

Like, let me get some exercise, but that usually brings you down

Simone:

and it usually will bring you down.

Simone:

And it's just, I've had to try different things.

Simone:

And for the most part, I can say, we'll say 75, 80% of the time, if I do some

Simone:

cardio, like what you described, I'm going to my blood sugar is going to go down.

Simone:

And the fact that you said prior to your blood sugar was in range.

Simone:

So 70 to 100.

Simone:

Cause that's what I was listening for at first, because a lot of people

Simone:

don't realize when they're high and they work out or have ketones.

Simone:

That's a no-no and then you can go higher because you've

Simone:

already started in that range.

Simone:

But for you to have started in a normal range, it's just kinda like, it was

Simone:

one of those days your body decided, okay, well, let's go up instead of down.

Simone:

And did you have a snack, a pre snack or anything before you had worked out?

Taylor:

I, the only thing, only thing that I have with some water and

Taylor:

actually you reminded me, I'm like, did I take my dreads this morning?

Taylor:

Because I was so thrown off?

Taylor:

I, I, I it's to the point where, you know, when you, when you pop pills

Taylor:

in the morning, especially, it's just like you do it and I drink so much

Taylor:

water, then I'm like, did I dunno?

Taylor:

So I'll I'll for me to handle off.

Taylor:

I just had some water, I checked I used to talk about three times in the

Taylor:

morning because I woke up around 4:00 AM.

Taylor:

just, I had a weird dream.

Taylor:

And so I checked and then I went back to sleep.

Taylor:

Then I checked again and that's where I was like one

Taylor:

Oh two or something like that.

Taylor:

And then as I was getting ready to get up, that's when I was at seven yeah.

Taylor:

Seven and it was saying I was going to be dropping.

Taylor:

And so I'm like, okay.

Taylor:

but usually I don't, I don't feel my lows until I get to like low sixties

Taylor:

and it doesn't feel bad for me.

Taylor:

And I'm used to working out on an empty stomach anyway.

Taylor:

So usually I prefer to work out in the mornings AA.

Taylor:

I like to get it over with and be, just for that kind of

Taylor:

fat burning zone, if you will.

Taylor:

I kind of, I've just never had issues working out on an empty stomach.

Taylor:

So just some water which I try to do in the mornings.

Taylor:

And then, I, I did my thing and it's, there's no way, it's just body weights

Taylor:

because the, the app supernatural, it has gives you like these, I dunno if you've

Taylor:

ever done like beat saber or any type of VR stuff, you basically these two bats

Taylor:

and they have these balloons that you're hitting kind of to the beat of the music.

Taylor:

and then they have these triangles that you do a squat or a lunge, and

Taylor:

you might go side to side or whatever.

Taylor:

So it's kind of this full body squatting and you're moving your arms around a lot.

Taylor:

Yeah.

Taylor:

And it's fast.

Taylor:

So I'm, I'm S dripped, sweat.

Taylor:

It's so much fun.

Taylor:

because it's it's game.

Taylor:

Like I realized that's my joyful movement.

Taylor:

If it's like a game, if I have to get accuracy or beat sabers, the one that.

Taylor:

Constantly test is my patients.

Taylor:

Cause I like it.

Taylor:

But like if I don't hit something right, or you don't have to meet

Taylor:

a certain goal, I'm like, all right, I'm gonna do it again.

Taylor:

Cause I'm a gamer.

Taylor:

So that, that speaks to me.

Taylor:

so I was really happy about it cause it's like, it's my thing.

Taylor:

And then I have this really cool meditation app that I'll

Taylor:

do afterwards that has this really pretty visuals with it.

Taylor:

but yeah, my CGM was beeping the like back half of the workout.

Taylor:

I'm like, I'm like, okay, maybe it's a low, but I feel okay.

Taylor:

So I'm, I'm fine.

Taylor:

I'm fine.

Taylor:

And then I look and I'm like, this bitch is beeping.

Taylor:

Yeah.

Simone:

And it never.

Taylor:

I will say they have different levels of intensity and this was

Taylor:

my first like super high intensity.

Taylor:

Like I was struggling like to keep up because the way they had it.

Taylor:

So I don't know if that makes a difference.

Taylor:

Like other times it's enough to get my heart rate going

Taylor:

enough to get me sweating.

Taylor:

But this one I'm like moving super it's like going from like, am.

Taylor:

light elliptical, or like, a brisk walk to full on spin class.

Taylor:

That's probably the only way I could describe it, but.

Simone:

Yeah.

Simone:

Cause definitely, I mean, you're, you're going to have to try it again.

Simone:

It it's always going to be that okay.

Simone:

This time this happened.

Simone:

Let me see, let me, you, you have to find your pattern.

Simone:

It's Navy needs a lot of figuring out things is about the pattern.

Simone:

So like for me, I know that if I'm going in to lift weights, my

Simone:

blood sugar is going to go up.

Simone:

I know that if I'm going in to do cardio and even if like, let's

Simone:

just say I'm rocking the steps and I'm just rolling up in steps.

Simone:

It depends for me on the amount of time.

Simone:

If I only do the steps for 20 minutes, even though I'm sweating and I pushed

Simone:

it, I might not see 20, 30 minutes.

Simone:

I won't really see a change in my blood sugar.

Simone:

Now, if I go an hour, that's when I start to know, okay.

Simone:

Either depending on where I was to start, maybe I need a snack before or

Simone:

wait till I get to the midpoint and see where I'm at and then have a snack.

Simone:

So really it's.

Simone:

It's a lot of trial and error when you get with that, when you have diabetes.

Simone:

And the hardest part that I feel about it is you do all this trial and error

Simone:

and then something, some outside force comes in and changes the whole script.

Simone:

So like the things that we didn't discuss in basic diabetes training,

Simone:

I mean, monthly menstrual cycles for women can change their blood sugars.

Simone:

a just things that I I've heard people say, Oh, I used to be able to eat this.

Simone:

And now I can't.

Simone:

And it's kind of like, you really don't know why.

Simone:

So I feel, I felt like trial and error era never ends.

Simone:

It just keeps going.

Simone:

It's like, okay, what is this?

Simone:

How is this affecting me?

Simone:

This.

Simone:

Time at this age, I know for me, hidden 35, so many things

Simone:

changed and I'm like, Whoa, wait.

Simone:

I just, I went up a year in age, but compared to my 20 year old

Simone:

diabetes and my 35 year old diabetes.

Simone:

So it's interesting to see the difference in things.

Simone:

And it could be the day-to-day things like, because I have diabetes, it

Simone:

doesn't mean I can't drink alcohol.

Simone:

I drink, I enjoy my twenties being a diabetic, then stop me.

Simone:

But I trial and error.

Simone:

What works for me?

Simone:

What doesn't work for me.

Simone:

And now at 35 I've I've had to.

Simone:

Okay, well now it's changed a little bit.

Simone:

I never really had the monthly, like hormone changes for me.

Simone:

I don't see that much difference in my blood sugars, but everybody

Simone:

is different, so different.

Simone:

And it's just what works for you may not work for the next person and vice versa.

Taylor:

Yeah, I think that's something that I've been playing around with

Taylor:

because sometimes I've been doing like early mid day, afternoon workouts on it

Taylor:

because I'm like, all right, let me get some stuff knocked out in the mornings.

Taylor:

and then, around one, two o'clock, I'll either go take a walk with my dogs or I'll

Taylor:

hop on my Oculus and do some stuff because I'm like, I can give this 30 minutes.

Taylor:

It really does fly by.

Taylor:

and there's this star Wars game that I'm legit going to buy it.

Taylor:

They have like three different episodes and you're like

Taylor:

Darth Vader's minion person.

Taylor:

And.

Taylor:

Yeah, who doesn't want to be a Jedi Knight, like come on.

Taylor:

Like they even give you the force and there anyways,

Taylor:

I'm nerding out because yes.

Taylor:

So, finding the thing that like, Oh my God, this speaks to my soul.

Taylor:

This is what helps me move is awesome.

Taylor:

Even when we had like an Oculus night at my partner's house, like I need to

Taylor:

get back in the gym, like, I'm tired.

Taylor:

Like I'm so wedded, like, yeah.

Taylor:

So it's like, cool.

Taylor:

But you know, figuring, like you said, it's trial and error of

Taylor:

like, okay, what times of day?

Taylor:

maybe better for me.

Taylor:

Like maybe I don't need to work on in the morning.

Taylor:

Maybe it's that, early afternoon that, that really flows well with me because my

Taylor:

body is still kind of going through its wake up process and I need to get some

Taylor:

breakfast in me and it's, it's, if I do go to the gym, it's probably the time where

Taylor:

most people aren't there because they're probably off their lunch break already.

Taylor:

And there's, back at work, so trying to figure out these different ways.

Taylor:

I really wish my apartment would just open up our freaking gym, but you know,

Taylor:

Finding these different ways to test.

Taylor:

And that's why I will say I love my CGM and I really, really, really

Taylor:

wish that they were more widely available to diabetics without

Taylor:

having to wait through going through the finger finger pricking stage.

Taylor:

because it just, you just don't get the same value of information

Taylor:

with a normal, finger glucose meter than you do with the constant one.

Taylor:

And that is really helped me out because I'm seeing, okay, I was having that crazy.

Taylor:

What is it?

Taylor:

The smoky effect where I go stupid low, and I'm woken up at three, three

Taylor:

in the morning, like what the hell?

Taylor:

And most of the time I haven't needed to get a snack really

Taylor:

one time I was like, Oh shit.

Taylor:

If I don't get a snack, me and Oreos.

Taylor:

Yes.

Taylor:

It was just what I had to do.

Taylor:

And then, the feet to the floor thing, I mean, I know there's a.

Taylor:

The Dawn phenomenon kind of mixed within that, but lately I've been even.

Taylor:

And so then I literally get up and I start walking and I scan and I'm like, I went

Taylor:

from one Oh two to one 30, what the hell?

Taylor:

Like, so it's just that constant trying to understand what your body is doing.

Taylor:

And I wish we could have our own episodes of like, have you ever seen

Taylor:

that show sells at work on Netflix?

Taylor:

I freaking love that show.

Taylor:

It is the key.

Taylor:

I've watched both in English and Japanese.

Taylor:

I love it that much.

Taylor:

because I feel like it's, it's the perfect way to portray, how your body works.

Taylor:

And every time they're like, Oh, I need to stop and get some glucose.

Taylor:

I'm like, like, but I wish, I wish it would explain.

Taylor:

The trauma that happened when they had to get the blood transfusion.

Taylor:

Like, I wish they would explain like, like, did he get shot?

Taylor:

Like what happened?

Taylor:

Like what happened to the box?

Taylor:

Why is, why is that was like the scariest part for me, I was like,

Taylor:

shit is getting real in this show.

Taylor:

What happened?

Taylor:

Somebody explained it to me, but I hope they do more of that

Taylor:

and take on, different things.

Taylor:

Cause the cancer episode was really interesting because, if we could

Taylor:

see our bodies like that, I'm like, man, what's going on on the

Taylor:

inside, it would be really cool.

Taylor:

So I could be like, Hey blood cells, the fuck is going on.

Taylor:

All right.

Taylor:

Can you tell me what's going on?

Taylor:

Hey can you go holler it, go, go down to the pancreas and hollered insulin and

Taylor:

be like, yo, you're late for the party.

Taylor:

I need you to let

Simone:

Are you

Taylor:

so I can get down.

Taylor:

Cause I'm trying to work out for you, can y'all can we have a Alto?

Taylor:

Can we have a team huddle real quick?

Taylor:

And we discussed.

Taylor:

Why you are doing this to me right now.

Taylor:

Like, I really wish I could just have a cell that work meeting where like

Taylor:

everybody just, I have this big screen projection throughout my entire body.

Taylor:

And I'm like, we need to have a conversation about these blood sugar lows.

Simone:

I'll come to that?

Simone:

Cause I feel like security security led my insulate.

Simone:

Why are you holding my, why are you holding my insulin at the door?

Simone:

Please land my insulating.

Taylor:

the list fam.

Simone:

They've been on the lave, never come off.

Simone:

They are the first person on his list.

Simone:

Now you have the diabetes, you have blurry vision.

Simone:

Let's talk about this because you all know my insulin.

Simone:

So yes, I totally totally understand.

Simone:

I love that show.

Simone:

I miss the cancer word, but.

Taylor:

Oh yeah.

Taylor:

That's, that's the one that led to, to the big body trauma, but that it's like

Taylor:

one of the, like second to last, like one of those last couple of episodes,

Taylor:

but I really do hope I need to look that up and see if Netflix are going to renew

Taylor:

it, because I think it is a beautiful way to explain everything going on in your

Taylor:

body and, being able to, I mean, can you imagine how awesome that is for kids?

Taylor:

I mean, we grew up with some great animate, right?

Taylor:

And now you're getting this, anime has always been a great way to give

Taylor:

you this underlining message of learning something, and cells at work.

Taylor:

I feel like just could open so many doors and so many eyes as to what

Taylor:

exactly is happening inside of your body when certain things like diabetes,

Taylor:

TCOs Crohn's disease, Lyme disease.

Taylor:

I don't know.

Taylor:

There's, there's so many things that could tell

Simone:

Yeah.

Taylor:

Man, if we could just animate this, how many more people would

Taylor:

be educated and understanding this, and, and maybe even bringing in the

Taylor:

fact that like, yeah, male, female, whole nother world render, you know

Taylor:

of, of stuff that could take place.

Taylor:

so I'm, I'm not now I'm going to have to look up, am gonna have to

Taylor:

look up to see if they're going to come out with another season.

Taylor:

And then if they don't like find the petition of why they need to keep

Taylor:

doing it and then be now, I feel like I'm going to rewatch the whole

Taylor:

season because it's such a good show.

Taylor:

If you've not seen selves at work.

Taylor:

It's so great.

Taylor:

It's so great.

Taylor:

Like, we'll read so little white blood cell.

Taylor:

They're just,

Simone:

Yep.

Taylor:

that's cute anyways.

Simone:

The adults need that too.

Simone:

Like adults, I feel like a lot of times with when you're talking to

Simone:

your medical providers, they use all of this medical terminology.

Simone:

People don't understand, they're afraid to ask, what is that?

Simone:

What does that mean?

Simone:

And so I have a cousin, she tells me that I am the most medical nonmedical

Simone:

nurse that she knows because I'm just like, I don't want to use that term.

Simone:

I just want to say what it is.

Simone:

I don't need to use the medical term.

Simone:

I don't need to, I know it's the three piece, but I just want

Simone:

to say you're drinking a lot.

Simone:

You're going to the bathroom a lot.

Simone:

You're eating a lot because when I say polyuria, polydipsia, polyphagia, people

Simone:

are like, Crickey and they will ask me, what, what is that they don't ask.

Simone:

And then when you, I found that when you say, okay, do you have any questions?

Simone:

A lot of times people say no, because they don't know what to ask.

Simone:

They don't know what you just said.

Simone:

What did you say?

Simone:

Say it again.

Simone:

So that's a part of me stepping out into this space to be able to teach things

Simone:

and educated and give you real life.

Simone:

This is what I go through.

Simone:

This is not just, Oh, on paper.

Simone:

It looks great.

Simone:

Sometimes it does.

Simone:

Sometimes it doesn't, I'm not perfect.

Simone:

Sometimes I use the same syringe more than one, like things like that.

Taylor:

So many lances that haven't been used because why would I

Taylor:

change it every day, non to that?

Taylor:

Now that I've got to see doom, I just stare at the box.

Taylor:

Like just make some maracas out of these cars.

Taylor:

Just

Simone:

Oh, I have, so I have boxes of stuff.

Simone:

I'm a tap on my boxes of supplies.

Simone:

Like, Oh, here we go.

Simone:

I don't know what I'm supposed to do.

Taylor:

that, that quarantine box thing where the bunch of our diabetic friends

Taylor:

and we're just all like shaking our different lances to be, cause we don't,

Taylor:

we have so many that would be fun.

Taylor:

We might need to do that.

Taylor:

well I would love to know.

Taylor:

I mean, you've given so much insight and I'm so grateful for

Taylor:

your expertise and things and by the way, guys, general advice here.

Taylor:

All right.

Taylor:

So make sure you talk with your medical professionals before you go do anything.

Taylor:

but I, I would love to just take a moment to talk about your your platform,

Taylor:

diabetes Bay, what it stands for and, and where you want to take this.

Taylor:

Cause I know you're wanting to kind of step out of the the hospital, the medical

Taylor:

room, and do more on the online space.

Taylor:

And I would love for people to hear what you're up to you and how you can better

Taylor:

help them with their diabetic needs.

Taylor:

outside of a.

Taylor:

Exam room.

Taylor:

There you go.

Taylor:

I was like, what's the word?

Simone:

Okay.

Simone:

So diabetes Bay Bay stands for believing in you advocating for

Simone:

you and empowering through you.

Simone:

I feel like a lot of people don't realize there is so much support out there.

Simone:

the internet has just opened up a world for us that wasn't there

Simone:

when I was diagnosed as a diabetic.

Simone:

And it's, it's honestly hard, you see the doctor, he goes, if you have, if

Simone:

you have an endocrinologist, you should be seeing them every three months.

Simone:

Some people only go to their regular primary care doctor, which

Simone:

could be six months to a year.

Simone:

So that in between time.

Simone:

You need help.

Simone:

You don't want to feel like you have to call the doctor

Simone:

every day or stuff is going on.

Simone:

And so the reason I started diabetes Bay is because I feel like

Simone:

a lot of people out there don't know where to go for that help.

Simone:

They need the help.

Simone:

they're confused.

Simone:

They feel alone, they're like, okay, how do I work this for me?

Simone:

When I was, before I became a nurse, when I went to get my first insulin

Simone:

pump, I remember the doctor's office.

Simone:

They handed me three folders and they said, go home and choose one.

Simone:

I had no idea.

Simone:

So I picked the one that had no Tubi it looks good.

Simone:

That's how with the Omni pod I'm like, why would I want to be, let me

Simone:

go with this one only makes sense.

Simone:

I didn't really know.

Simone:

I mean, trying to sit there and read that information and

Simone:

understand the ins and outs.

Simone:

It's white.

Simone:

Things like YouTube and people's videos on YouTube have become such a great

Simone:

tool because it gives, it would have given me the chance to go on there and

Simone:

really see, okay, well maybe I don't want this one without the tubing.

Simone:

So what I would like to do with this with my business is, education

Simone:

educating, especially people of color.

Simone:

I feel that a lot of times, people of color there is it's a wealth

Simone:

gap, but there's also a gap in medical and not understanding or

Simone:

not trusting the medical providers.

Simone:

I know how it feels to want somebody that looks like me, but

Simone:

then also to have somebody that's dealing with the same thing as me.

Simone:

So I want to be that person.

Simone:

For any, and everybody that needs that help, I meet people all the time.

Simone:

They're like my grandmother, my grandfather has diabetes.

Simone:

I don't, I don't know which type it is.

Simone:

We need to start talking about these things, family history, how

Simone:

that could potentially affect you, even though, you're like I'm young.

Simone:

I might know that doesn't mean that you can't one day come up with

Simone:

diabetes in your twenties or thirties.

Simone:

I also want to focus on with type one diabetes.

Simone:

It used to be called juvenile diabetes.

Simone:

And they're, I mean, I still see that name somewhere, but there are so many adults

Simone:

being diagnosed with type one diabetes, and I've talked to some recently and they

Simone:

even said, I didn't get any education.

Simone:

I went to the doctor, they gave me this.

Simone:

And like you said, they gave me some pamphlets.

Simone:

They said, call this person I did, or I didn't, nobody checked on it.

Simone:

And nobody said anything.

Simone:

So I just want to help people, the underserved people of color, people that

Simone:

aren't getting, the things that they need.

Simone:

And I want to be able to do it and say it in my way, the way that they'll

Simone:

understand, understanding how they understand how they talk, are older, my

Simone:

grandparents, Oh, you got that sugar.

Simone:

That's just that shook.

Simone:

So knowing what that means, there are still people that don't even, I

Simone:

tell somebody that they were, like, she said, I said, that's diabetes.

Simone:

That's what they call it, the sugar.

Simone:

Right.

Simone:

So I understand, I know exactly what you're saying.

Simone:

and just, finding other ways to help them and say, okay, I know you, you love to

Simone:

eat this, but let me figure out a way to find a great place for it, to still be

Simone:

in your diet, but maybe not every day.

Simone:

So that's the goal of diabetes Bay.

Taylor:

Man.

Taylor:

That's, that's super awesome.

Taylor:

And I think that's one thing I love about what I'm doing now is, I thought

Taylor:

that my mission was going to be to educate in a way of like, let's

Taylor:

do college or something like that.

Taylor:

And I'm like, no, I'm, I've always been a glue between people.

Taylor:

I'm always a person trying to like bring groups of friends together.

Taylor:

Like I love just this connection of like, You know this network of, okay.

Taylor:

I told you earlier, Hey, you need somebody to talk to you about your, your child.

Taylor:

Who's, been recently diagnosed, I've got a friend for that.

Taylor:

She literally works with kids all the time and she's a type

Taylor:

one, she can understand that.

Taylor:

Or, Hey, I didn't get the education.

Taylor:

And you said more.

Taylor:

And just this hour that had, I known that six years ago, who knows now, obviously I

Taylor:

was meant to be on this path for a reason.

Taylor:

I would, we wouldn't be sitting here if I wasn't.

Taylor:

So I won't, I won't knock not having it, but even still just recognizing

Taylor:

the lack of access, especially for, our communities of color.

Taylor:

And, and like, I think you said it perfectly, like not trusting

Taylor:

the providers, there's so many in our community where it's

Taylor:

like, we didn't go to the doctor.

Taylor:

Or we couldn't go to the doctor because we didn't have insurance or whatever.

Taylor:

It may be something prevented us from going.

Taylor:

And when you are treated more like a number than you are a person it

Taylor:

makes it very difficult to feel like, okay, I'm going to go in here and do

Taylor:

something versus I'm going to go in here.

Taylor:

They're going to give me a bunch of drugs and hope for the best, and us having

Taylor:

to take things into our own hands is it's, it's really hurting our community

Taylor:

because we no longer know what we should trust and it should be equal parts.

Taylor:

Go get the professional opinion, right.

Taylor:

Be willing to speak up for yourself.

Taylor:

I refuse to allow any of my appointments to be a five minute

Taylor:

treat the assistance symptoms.

Taylor:

You're going to sit here and you're going to listen to me.

Taylor:

And if I don't agree with what you're saying, I'm going to tell you, and I need

Taylor:

us to have a dialogue on how we can make this work, because it is a partnership.

Taylor:

if you want to just write scripts for people like.

Taylor:

You in the wrong business, the, the what is it?

Taylor:

The doctor's oath touches on.

Taylor:

I shall write a bunch of prescriptions, put you on a bunch of

Taylor:

medication to keep my pockets line.

Taylor:

Right.

Taylor:

so it's just one of those things where like, we have to educate

Taylor:

ourselves on how to interact with our medical professionals.

Taylor:

We have to educate ourselves in the fact of whatever it is we're going through.

Taylor:

We need to research the medications we're on.

Taylor:

We need to understand what options are out there.

Taylor:

We need to seek community that can provide us with insights and

Taylor:

perspective, and then make our own informed decision to use your brains.

Taylor:

People.

Taylor:

I love you, but please use your brains.

Taylor:

Okay.

Taylor:

Use your brains to make informed decisions.

Taylor:

Don't just go with what everybody else says, because that's how

Taylor:

we're kind of in this phase.

Taylor:

Now, cookie cutter solutions when we are all very beautifully.

Taylor:

So that's my

Simone:

Oh, you made me think about the sentiment to me.

Taylor:

listen to the episode with me and Mike, and we talk

Taylor:

about that damn city challenge.

Simone:

I gotta listen to it.

Taylor:

Cause that was hilarious.

Taylor:

Like, no, like y'all no amount of sediment is going to save us from diabetes.

Simone:

I've heard it all.

Simone:

I've heard it all.

Simone:

And I feel like this recently, yes.

Simone:

Having this think it mind say, I'm like, I know there's a lot of

Simone:

things you can do and maybe yes.

Simone:

You'll, you'll take have to take less insulin or just, I feel like a lot of

Simone:

times there's so much focus on weight and I meet people that aren't even

Simone:

overweight and have type two diabetes.

Simone:

Where do they have?

Simone:

Where are they supposed to lose the weight from?

Taylor:

right,

Simone:

So it it's.

Simone:

I totally understand.

Simone:

And this is why I am here.

Simone:

Yeah.

Taylor:

man.

Taylor:

I'm so glad you're here.

Taylor:

well speaking of you being here, how can people.

Taylor:

Get connected with you.

Taylor:

Cause I clearly know how to get connected with you, but for those

Taylor:

who don't, how can they reach you?

Taylor:

How can they work with you?

Taylor:

If they have questions, just want to chat things out.

Taylor:

how can they get in touch to make sure that they're keeping up with

Taylor:

all the great things you're doing?

Simone:

Yeah.

Simone:

So my Instagram is diabetes Bay.

Simone:

I am actually working on building my website, so it's under construction,

Simone:

but right now it is a landing page.

Simone:

It's diabetes bay.com.

Simone:

And you can put in your email address, you can also even

Simone:

book a discovery call with me.

Simone:

So I have that link on diabetes, bay.com as well as.

Simone:

The link is on my Instagram profile for diabetes Bay.

Simone:

I am looking for some diabetics who would love to do discovery

Simone:

calls with me this month of April.

Simone:

and just, talk about what are your pain points, what areas do you need help with?

Simone:

So that way I can focus on how to build my program around the biggest pain points

Simone:

that people are saying that they have.

Simone:

I am also on clubhouse.

Simone:

I'm working with one lady.

Simone:

She has a diabetic, it is supposed to be like a parents and caregivers trying

Simone:

to build that up, so like this week we do usually do Tuesday nights at 7:00

Simone:

PM central time, this upcoming week.

Simone:

We're gonna talk about Oh, man, what is Oh, stress and burnout.

Simone:

And then the on two-thirds are Tuesdays on Thursdays and Saturdays.

Simone:

I do a group and I was called diabetes connection.

Simone:

We talk about everything in there.

Simone:

So this past Thursday, we talked about alcohol and diabetes.

Taylor:

I missed that one.

Simone:

tonight.

Simone:

Yes.

Simone:

And I gave out my favorite mixer.

Simone:

I'm like, Hey, don't think I'm an alcoholic, but diet Chick-fil-A lemonade

Simone:

keeps me from having to take insulin when I'm mixing it with drinks with alcohol.

Simone:

So, definitely was a fun room.

Simone:

tonight we're talking about foot care.

Simone:

And so by the time you're hearing this or listening right now, I can't

Simone:

tell you what our topic will be, but usually we just, find what's going on

Simone:

with people or do people have the most questions about, and we picked two

Simone:

great topics to speak on each week.

Taylor:

I'm excited.

Taylor:

I there's so many, it's so hard because I could be on clubhouse all day.

Taylor:

And I know everybody talks about like, it's such a time

Taylor:

suck because I can't help it.

Taylor:

I want to just creep and listen, and then I'll hop in a room and I'm so grateful for

Taylor:

those who asked me, don't get me wrong.

Taylor:

But then like come up and speak.

Taylor:

And I'm like, Do I ignore it or do I go speak?

Taylor:

And it's probably cause I just like to hear myself talk sometimes, but

Taylor:

I should save that for the pocket.

Taylor:

That's the, but so many great rooms.

Taylor:

Yeah.

Simone:

Every time, like, wait, I don't want to speak.

Simone:

I just wanted to listen.

Taylor:

Well, I, I, I just, I just, there's no option that well I've

Taylor:

seen people change their picture that says I'm just listening.

Taylor:

Right.

Taylor:

And so I feel like I need to create a little canvas thing where like

Taylor:

I can swap that out on those days.

Taylor:

because it's.

Taylor:

It really is a time suck and it's beautiful to hear stories and be,

Taylor:

be able to go in these rooms and kind of get perspective on things.

Taylor:

but at the same time, you just feel that called to like represent

Taylor:

your perspective at the same time.

Taylor:

So you want to get up there.

Taylor:

And a lot of the rooms that I ended up in are more, mostly type one.

Taylor:

So I feel like as the sole type two, I need to go say something cause it's

Taylor:

like, Hey, I'm here to, but I'm loving that diabetic topics and health topics

Taylor:

are picking up more in clubhouse.

Taylor:

I know part of it is their, their algorithm, they're still working

Taylor:

it out, but I, you and, and several other people I've been connected with.

Taylor:

and it, it's almost like, let's see if you all are doing Tuesdays, Thursdays

Taylor:

and Saturdays Mike's room is on Mondays.

Taylor:

It's like already four times a week.

Taylor:

Right.

Taylor:

And I'm like, If I start a room, I'm going to have to do mine on like

Taylor:

Wednesdays or something like that.

Taylor:

Conflicted everybody.

Taylor:

there's so many people doing great rooms, so, I am excited to see what you do.

Taylor:

I will gladly ensure that people know to hit you up to let you know what,

Taylor:

what the diabetic community needs.

Taylor:

Please keep doing what you're doing.

Taylor:

Your contribution is so great.

Taylor:

so the last couple of questions, and I swear I will let you get back to your day.

Taylor:

is what is one piece of advice that you would give a newly diagnosed?

Taylor:

Yeah,

Simone:

Okay.

Simone:

while I think about that, I'm going to say, thank you for having me today.

Simone:

I really love your space.

Simone:

It is dynamic.

Simone:

I'm excited for season three and all of the other guests that

Simone:

you're going to have on here.

Simone:

So I just want to say thank you for having that diabetes stationary room that

Simone:

day, because it definitely connected us.

Simone:

And I pray that this is a lifelong cooler.

Simone:

I can't even say the word connection.

Simone:

So I'm just, thank you SIS, because God put us together.

Simone:

I'm like, she's my sister, my diabetes sister.

Simone:

I love it.

Simone:cause when I was diagnosed in:Simone:

in high school, I wasn't even in high school yet, but when I was

Simone:

in ninth grade, I had a pager.

Simone:

There were not cell phones.

Simone:

There was not YouTube, Instagram, Facebook.

Simone:

I mean, Facebook came out.

Simone:

I was in college, I think because you had to have a college email address to have

Simone:

a Facebook account when it first started.

Simone:

So my one piece of advice would be, find, find support, like

Simone:

when you're initially diagnosed.

Simone:

it's hard.

Simone:

It is.

Simone:

I felt like is my life over?

Simone:

What does this mean?

Simone:

I was 13.

Simone:

I'm like, what, what?

Simone:

Wait.

Simone:

am I going to be okay?

Simone:

Can I never eat sugar again?

Simone:

I mean, all of those things that you see here, all of those myths that

Simone:

are out there, that's the only thing that I really knew about diabetes.

Simone:

And so I watched, my grandparents, my grandma with type two, but I was

Simone:

like, Oh my gosh, I ate too much sugar.

Simone:

I remember thinking that because that's what they always say, Oh, you ate too

Simone:

much sugar until I'm like, mom, I'm sorry.

Simone:

I take it back.

Simone:

I don't, I don't want to have this.

Simone:

I don't want to give myself a shot.

Simone:

So you honestly need that support.

Simone:

And because there are apps and websites and social media and so

Simone:

many there's if you, even with COVID.

Simone:

There are still local support groups that maybe they're having a zoom

Simone:

meeting and maybe once restrictions live, you can go face to face if

Simone:

you want to meet other diabetics.

Simone:

there are things like beyond type one has a pen pal program it's

Simone:

called snip the snail mail club.

Simone:

And I actually just got a new pin pal she's in Brazil with

Simone:

type one diabetes as well.

Simone:

So just finding a sub a really good support system to have people to talk

Simone:

to somebody, to ask questions to you're going to have to kind of weed out

Simone:

because you'll, you'll get some answers.

Simone:

Like we were talking about the cinnamon and all sorts of things, but you know,

Simone:

there's a wealth of information out there and it's really easy to find

Simone:

great support groups and have somebody that knows what you're going through

Simone:

and they're going through it as well.

Taylor:

Yeah.

Taylor:

Yeah, absolutely.

Taylor:

I think that that's been a common theme is this just find the community we are

Taylor:

truly here to support each and every one of you, no matter what type because we

Taylor:

understand it is different and it is a unique journey for each individual, but

Taylor:

it does not mean you have to do it alone.

Taylor:

so absolutely Bravo on that.

Taylor:

Well, my blood sugar sister from another Mister.

Taylor:

I have had so much fun with this conversation and with just the

Taylor:

amount of education and wealth of knowledge that you've given us.

Taylor:

So thank you again for your time, your energy and all of the efforts that

Taylor:

you were putting out into the world for our people and for those who are

Taylor:

allies to us it is greatly appreciated.

Taylor:

Keep doing what you're doing.

Taylor:

I'm constantly going to be reading for you.

Taylor:

So, obviously this is not the last time I will be talking to you, but we'll

Taylor:

hopefully be able to, to work in a, a follow-up in later seasons to see where

Taylor:

you're at and how things are going.

Taylor:

definitely make sure that you follow Simone at diabetes Bay and

Taylor:

check out everything that she's doing on Instagram clubhouse.

Taylor:

And don't forget to hit her up for those discovery calls her help you.

Taylor:

Alright, we'll catch you guys next time.

Taylor:

Man.

Taylor:

I was serious about cells at work, doing a diabetes version.

Taylor:

And any version I'm gonna, I'm seriously gonna look up to see if

Taylor:

they're doing a season two and if not, like start a petition that they

Taylor:

should, because that's a great show.

Taylor:

If you haven't watched it, it's a great show.

Taylor:

But aside from that, I honestly, we could have talked for

Taylor:

hours similar to Britt Olson.

Taylor:

Like she is one of those people that we can literally talk for hours and she's

Taylor:

so down and ready to serve the community.

Taylor:

And I just love her spirit and wanting to just.

Taylor:

Be as helpful as possible and provide as much information and being willing

Taylor:

to connect with others and continue this life of not only being a diabetic

Taylor:

and thriving as one, but ensuring that others, including allies are

Taylor:

familiar with how our lives go as well.

Taylor:

So.

Taylor:

Thank you again, Simone.

Taylor:

And I just am so grateful for your presence in everything

Taylor:

that you have provided.

Taylor:

Not only to the show, but to me and everybody else out there.

Taylor:

So thank you guys for your time.

Taylor:

I will catch you next week on Tuesday for another episode of

Taylor:

hindsight thoughts until then.

Taylor:

I hope you have a good week.

Taylor:

Thank you for your time and energy.