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Her Life with MODY

Have you ever heard of MODY? My guess is probably not unless you’re living with it. Not to worry today’s guest Kylie is about to educate us all on MODY diabetes. She even shared some amazing resources to help everyone learn more. Be sure to check them out!

KEY POINTS

  • What exactly is MODY?
  •  Life changes
  • MODY Advocacy

Find more at www.healinginhindsight.com

CONNECT WITH KYLIE

www.instagram.com/mylifewithmody/

RESOURCES ON MODY

https://monogenicdiabetes.uchicago.edu/our-research/mody-registry/

https://www.atypicaldiabetesnetwork.org/

Onset Diabetes Maturity of the Young (MODY) – Harvard Health

CONNECT WITH THE SHOW

Healing in Hindsight™ is managed by host Taylor Daniele™ and Produced by We Are 8 Studios

Transcript
Taylor:

Hey, everyone.

Taylor:

Welcome back to another episode of healing.

Taylor:

In hindsight, you are no BS source for thriving diabetes.

Taylor:

You already know me, Taylor, Daniele here for another guest episode,

Taylor:

and I'm really excited for this one because I learned so much in this

Taylor:

conversation with Kylie who is also known on Instagram at my life with MODY.

Taylor:

And if you don't know what MODY is.

Taylor:

You're about to find out.

Taylor:

MODY is a, another type of diabetes that a lot of people don't know exist.

Taylor:

I surely didn't.

Taylor:

And when I was on Instagram, looking at other diabetes, hashtags, I

Taylor:

saw posts from her and I just knew that I had to learn more.

Taylor:

I had to talk to her and I'm so grateful that she was willing to lend

Taylor:

her time to share her message today.

Taylor:

So stay tuned.

Taylor:

It's super informational and make sure you go follow Kylie

Taylor:

on Instagram because she says.

Taylor:

So many grateful insights on living with MODY on what MODY is and how you

Taylor:

yourself can ensure that if you're at already a diabetic or maybe you're just

Taylor:

not sure that when you get tested, you can make sure your diagnosis is correct.

Taylor:

Let's do it.

Taylor:

Well, hi, Kylie, how are you doing today?

Kylie:

I'm good.

Kylie:

Thank you.

Kylie:

How are you?

Taylor:

I'm doing well.

Taylor:

I'm doing pretty well.

Taylor:

I'm excited for this conversation because I feel like I'm about to learn so much.

Taylor:

And it won't give too much away.

Taylor:

I mean, I know the title will probably explain a lot, but when I first

Taylor:

came across your Instagram account, I was just like, what is this?

Taylor:

Why don't I know about it.

Taylor:

I need to learn more.

Taylor:

And so, I'm, I'm super stoked for us to get to sit down and chat.

Taylor:

So thank you so much for lending me your time for a little bit, to learn

Taylor:

more about your diabetic journey.

Taylor:

Yeah, of course.

Taylor:

So hopefully you do learn something and I don't let you down.

Taylor:

Not at all.

Taylor:

I think you will definitely provide a lot of great information for a lot

Taylor:

of people, but before we jump into that side of things since I am in the

Taylor:

only person who possibly knows who you are, I would love if you could just

Taylor:

introduce yourself and let us know where you're from and what your passions are.

Kylie:

Yeah.

Kylie:

So my name is Kylie I'm 27, almost 28 years old.

Kylie:

I live in Charlotte, North Carolina with my husband and our two cats and two dogs.

Kylie:

I am a board certified music therapist.

Kylie:

So I work with individuals with intellectual and developmental

Kylie:

disabilities, as well as older adults with Alzheimer's and dementia.

Kylie:

So music therapy is definitely one of my passions.

Kylie:

I have.

Kylie:

A form of diabetes called MODY.

Kylie:

And I'm assuming we'll get more

Kylie:

into that in a little bit.

Taylor:

Yeah.

Taylor:

I'm super excited.

Taylor:

Cause I've, I've talked to a couple of diabetic and non-diabetic friends

Taylor:

and they're like, What is that?

Taylor:

So I'm super stoked to get to that.

Taylor:

So, but before we do, because you definitely live the diabetic lifestyle,

Taylor:

I love to ask my diabetic guests, what is one misconception that you would just

Taylor:

love to just shut it down right now?

Taylor:

Stop the madness.

Taylor:

Here's the correct answer.

Taylor:

Please stop saying these things.

Taylor:

What's one thing that you would want, the, the non-diabetic world

Taylor:

to get the record straight on.

Taylor:

For me, you'll

Taylor:

see it.

Taylor:

I say it all the time.

Taylor:

Just that there's more than two types of diabetes.

Taylor:

I mean, it's so hard to get people to know that there's.

Taylor:

A difference between type one and type two.

Taylor:

So imagine having a different type than that and being like, no,

Taylor:

like no there's multiple types.

Taylor:

There are quite a few types of diabetes, so that's the biggest one for

Taylor:

me.

Taylor:

Yeah.

Taylor:

And, and I have to say, I'm, I'm really glad that I'm learning so

Taylor:

many more, I think the second.

Taylor:

Or I guess technically third type that I came into contact with

Taylor:

was, the, the Lada or 1.5 which is becoming more and more common.

Taylor:

And then you exposed me to MODY and, type three and then there's type three ABC.

Taylor:

And I'm like, okay, we're just kind of going down a line here.

Taylor:

And I'm not even sure where it stops.

Taylor:

Because it is, and it's constantly being misdiagnosed as type two.

Taylor:

And I even took a step further and got with my medical team.

Taylor:

I'm like, all right, I've talked to a lot of women, especially who have been

Taylor:

misdiagnosis type two around my age.

Taylor:

I'm 31.

Taylor:

Currently I was diagnosed at 25 and I'm like did y'all get this right?

Taylor:

Because you're not about to have me extra sick because you

Taylor:

didn't take it there right.

Taylor:

After a while.

Taylor:

I'm like, okay.

Taylor:

I probably shouldn't say like, you didn't get it.

Taylor:

Right.

Taylor:

Like it's, it's such new information.

Taylor:

It's so nuanced, we're trying to play catch up on understanding

Taylor:

the different variations.

Taylor:

So, it's so interesting, but yeah, I'm, I'm on the same wave now of

Taylor:

like, There's more than two types.

Taylor:

And don't assume that if somebody says diabetic, they're instantly type one.

Taylor:

I think one that's come up for me is like, when I do say I'm type two,

Taylor:

they're like, Oh, so you just don't eat.

Taylor:

Right.

Taylor:

And it's just, yeah.

Taylor:

And that's the other big misconception worst one is that

Taylor:

you somehow caused it yourself.

Taylor:

Like all right.

Taylor:

Yeah.

Taylor:

I totally, when I, go to bed every night, I was just like, please, please

Taylor:

give me time to, not ever, ever well.

Taylor:

Awesome.

Taylor:

Well, thank you so much for that because I think it, it flows right

Taylor:

into the question that's on my mind and I'm sure everybody else's mind.

Taylor:

What is MODY?

Kylie:

MODY is a genetic form of diabetes caused by a gene mutation.

Kylie:

So it's inherited.

Kylie:

So I inherited this gene mutation from my dad who inherited it from his mom.

Kylie:

So.

Kylie:

Most types of diabetes have some genetic component.

Kylie:

So maybe you're inheriting a few different genes from your mom or dad that

Kylie:

give you a greater risk for diabetes.

Kylie:

But with MODY, when you get this gene mutation, you will have diabetes.

Kylie:

It is one gene, and that gene says you have diabetes.

Kylie:

And so what the gene does is.

Kylie:

Causes your pancreas to basically just not produce enough insulin in most cases.

Kylie:

And then in one case in MODY two it just causes your body to have a higher

Kylie:

base level for what your blood sugar is.

Kylie:

So, whereas a normal person might run 70 to one 20, they're running a hundred

Kylie:

to 150 and that's just normal and even medication won't lower that, so.

Kylie:

Interesting.

Taylor:

So there's, there's two types of MODY on top of that.

Taylor:

Okay.

Taylor:

We got it.

Taylor:

So,

Kylie:

yeah, that's another thing.

Kylie:

There are up to 15 types of MODY

Kylie:

we have MODY three, which is the H one.

Kylie:

I I'm gonna mess that up.

Kylie:

But it's a specific gene.

Kylie:

And so each type of MODY is caused by a different gene mutation.

Kylie:

Y each type of MODY can present differently and have different like

Kylie:

comorbid things that go along with it.

Taylor:

Wow your face because I'm just like, okay, so 15 different types,

Taylor:

all gene related, all it can be.

Taylor:

And, and it, it just goes to show that everybody's diabetic journey is so

Taylor:

unique, just like your health in general.

Taylor:

So, I don't even, I don't even know how to get to the next question right now.

Taylor:

Just like 15.

Taylor:

Now that is my lucky number.

Taylor:

So I'm like, well, but it's just crazy because, To think that.

Taylor:

So both of my parents were type two and, and I knew that it ran on my mom's side.

Taylor:

On my mom's side and her mom's side back in Asia.

Taylor:

So I was like, okay, this is the thing to look out for.

Taylor:

And then, my dad was diagnosed also with both of them were

Taylor:

pretty, pretty late in age.

Taylor:

And then my grandma on my dad's side.

Taylor:

But I don't know if there's a full history there, between my, my grandma

Taylor:

and my grandpa, if that's a thing and.

Taylor:

That's something that's always come up is like, it's possibly

Taylor:

a genetic thing for me.

Taylor:

And so that's why I was like, okay, I need to be mindful because

Taylor:

it could creep up and it did.

Taylor:

I actually spent the year prior to my diagnosis trying to prevent it,

Taylor:

but I went about it the wrong way.

Taylor:

I was doing all the fed crash diets and it's sustainable.

Taylor:

But even realizing like, okay, if I want to have kids, I have to think about that.

Taylor:

I have to really understand.

Taylor:

My self in and out, including my diagnosis too, no that when this comes up if we

Taylor:

decide that we want to do that, then I need to kind of have a head start on

Taylor:

understanding that, cause then there's a whole we're automatically the high risk,

Taylor:

when we're pregnant, it's not about, are you going to have guests, guest rational?

Taylor:

I always.

Taylor:

Mess up that gestational spatial glory.

Taylor:

Jesus, they need to come up with better words, pregnant diabetes.

Taylor:

Can you just say that?

Taylor:

Can you just know that cause that, that these long words

Taylor:

are just unnecessary anyways.

Taylor:

But even that, and then, to come out of it and it's like, Hey, you might

Taylor:

pass this onto your child and not make it seem like it's a bad thing.

Taylor:

It's just a,

Kylie:

so that's another thing.

Kylie:

The thing with MODY as well is that it's so genetic, you have a 50% chance.

Kylie:

Of passing it on to each one of your children.

Kylie:

So kind of with type one and type two, it's like, Oh, there is a chance.

Kylie:

But it's definitely not as high as with MODY.

Kylie:

So that's something I'm yeah.

Kylie:

Currently dealing with.

Kylie:

And like you said, like there's so much preparation that goes into thinking

Kylie:

about having kids when you have diabetes.

Kylie:

And so for me, part of that has been, my children could very well.

Kylie:

Have diabetes as well.

Kylie:

And so do I feel guilty about that?

Kylie:

Do I just know that I'm extra prepared, if that is the case and kind

Kylie:

of dealing with all that goes into

Taylor:

knowing that yeah, yeah.

Taylor:

That it's it's it makes it so fascinating because you're just like,

Taylor:

For us, it's normal, at this point.

Taylor:

And, and to some degree, there's, at least I know in my journey when

Taylor:

I was still in denial, the first two years, I was just like, I don't

Taylor:

want this to be my normal right now.

Taylor:

I wouldn't want this to be for anybody else because it is such a

Taylor:

crazy disease to have, but at the same time, you see so many people

Taylor:

who are like kicking ass, honestly.

Taylor:

And it's like, If I have to, as, as type twos, you see a lot of

Taylor:

people in the type two space, like, Oh, reversing or, remission, or,

Taylor:

still trying to find the language.

Taylor:

And I'm like, yeah, when I first started this platform, that was my goal.

Taylor:

But you know, at this point I just want to be healthy.

Taylor:

And if that means that I gotta take medication for it, if that means that I

Taylor:

have to do all these special things fine.

Taylor:

I just want to make sure my body is optimized as much as possible.

Taylor:

All the drugs.

Taylor:

Great.

Taylor:

Yeah.

Taylor:

If

Kylie:

it comes down to eating a carnivore diet for me to not have diabetes, like

Kylie:

that's not for me, I'll take the medicine.

Taylor:

No, you have to do that.

Taylor:

The

Kylie:

rest of your life, you didn't really reverse it.

Kylie:

You just have found a way to manage it,

Taylor:

right?

Taylor:

Yeah.

Taylor:

Yeah.

Taylor:

My endocrinologist said to me now it's not that he's a bad guy.

Taylor:

I just felt like his, his language, around it.

Taylor:

And that's why I typically like to have female doctors.

Taylor:

Cause I don't feel like he was fully aware of the sensitivities

Taylor:

of talking about like weight in general with, with a female client.

Taylor:

But he's, he's still a good guy, but you know, he's just like, if you just lose

Taylor:

40 pounds and we work you off of this medication, then you'll be good and.

Taylor:

But the concern is if you gain the weight back, not only will your diabetes

Taylor:

come back, but it will come back worse.

Taylor:

And it's just like, Okay.

Taylor:

I don't know if I'm meant to be my high school.

Taylor:

Wait I'm definitely not living the same lifestyle as I was, I was a student

Taylor:

athlete and I was in theater and I was active in you're jumping from class

Taylor:

to class all the time and all of that.

Taylor:

And then just, you're still developing, like I'm a grown ass woman now,

Taylor:

so it's a little bit different and the older I get, my hormones

Taylor:

are going to continue to change.

Taylor:

So I don't know if telling me to lose and maintain.

Taylor:

A large amount of weight is the exact answer because that's, that's

Taylor:

leading me to a mindset that could turn obsessive, and so, that's yeah.

Taylor:

It's, it's, it's crazy.

Taylor:

So I am curious to know one, when were you diagnosed?

Taylor:

Like first as a diabetic?

Taylor:

Cause you were misdiagnosed.

Taylor:

Am I right?

Kylie:

So I have a memory of being misdiagnosed as type two, but then my

Kylie:

mom saw my story when I said that or something and was like, no, you weren't

Taylor:

corrected

Kylie:

me.

Kylie:

I was diagnosed with diabetes.

Kylie:I think about:Kylie:

And, and I was diagnosed because my dad was checking his blood

Kylie:

sugar on his meter and he didn't like whatever it was telling him.

Kylie:

And so he said, somebody else, let me check your blood sugar.

Kylie:

I want to make sure this meter's working correctly.

Kylie:

And my mom said, no, I don't want to go, go bother Kylie.

Kylie:

And so he comes over to me, pricks, my finger takes my blood

Kylie:

sugar and then says, Oh, you have

Taylor:

to go to the doctor.

Taylor:

Oh, wow.

Kylie:

Yeah, so my blood sugar was high.

Kylie:

I don't, I don't know what it was, but I do know that looking back I had symptoms,

Kylie:

it's just, they hadn't been quite severe enough for anyone to notice yet.

Kylie:

The most that anyone had noticed was my mom said.

Kylie:

You're drinking a lot of water and you're taking like multiple water

Kylie:

bottles to bed with you at night.

Kylie:

And I was just like, I'm, I'm really thirsty.

Kylie:

And I of course had been drinking tons of water.

Kylie:

I'm using the bathroom all the time, kind of those typical diabetes symptoms.

Kylie:

So then went to the doctor and.

Kylie:

I'm assuming they did antibody tests right away since I was 13

Kylie:

or 14 to see if I had type one.

Kylie:

But I didn't.

Kylie:

So I was just kind of

Taylor:

given a.

Kylie:

General diabetes diagnosis.

Kylie:

Apparently they were just kind of like you have diabetes and

Kylie:

we don't really know what type.

Kylie:

So I was put on Metformin and just sent home, but my blood

Kylie:

sugar was still, spiking a lot.

Kylie:

I was still having higher A1C.

Kylie:

It was kind of hard to control.

Kylie:

So my nurse practitioner was just doing some research and realized that

Kylie:

with my family history of diabetes.

Kylie:

So the two generations of people with diabetes and with the fact that my dad

Kylie:

and my grandma were taking medication that has been found to be highly effective

Kylie:

and people with MODY, she was like, Oh, Ding, ding, ding, that sounds right.

Kylie:

So she sent me to, a research hospital and they did the genetic

Kylie:

testing and I came back as

Taylor:

MODY three.

Taylor:

Wow.

Taylor:

Wow.

Taylor:

What is it about dads who are diabetic testing on their kids?

Taylor:

Because my dad did the same thing, but this was before I was diagnosed.

Taylor:

This was probably a while I was still in high school.

Taylor:

Usually the Wellstone high school or like my second year

Taylor:

or so living here in Austin.

Taylor:

I just remember I was, I was at home and it was probably the only

Taylor:

time I'd ever seen his, his meter and his Lancet because other than

Taylor:

that, I've never seen my parents.

Taylor:

Test their blood sugar.

Taylor:

I've seen their medication.

Taylor:

And, and obviously now, especially with this platform,

Taylor:

we talk about it all the time.

Taylor:

And I felt cool.

Taylor:

Cause I was like, Hey dad, look at my CGM.

Taylor:

You should get one.

Taylor:

So, but he, he was I Kimber what we were talking about and then.

Taylor:

He goes and he grabs his meter.

Taylor:

And so he's like, give me your finger.

Taylor:

I'm like, Hm.

Taylor:

I don't know about that.

Taylor:

Anytime somebody says something like that, you just automatic suspect.

Taylor:

Right.

Taylor:

And he's like, Oh, it'll be fine.

Taylor:

Like give your finger.

Taylor:

And my meter has or my Lancet has it to where you can like turn down

Taylor:

the severity of, of the spring.

Taylor:

Yeah.

Taylor:

Yeah.

Taylor:

He ain't do that.

Taylor:

And then he didn't go to the side.

Taylor:

He went right in the middle finger, you

Kylie:

know, the doctor's office.

Taylor:

You lied.

Taylor:

You said that wasn't gonna hurt that hurt.

Taylor:

I'm still bleeding.

Kylie:

I'm totally that friend that like will have all my friends, like

Kylie:

we'll all eat something sugary and all right, everybody put out your fingers.

Kylie:

I want to see what your

Taylor:

blood like, let me see.

Taylor:

Let's see.

Taylor:

Cause he was so upset after I think it was like 97 at the time.

Taylor:

He was like, so I don't know.

Kylie:

We ate pizza and I had, I was like to my husband, let

Kylie:

me check your blood sugar.

Kylie:

One Oh four.

Taylor:

Yeah.

Taylor:

Five pieces of pizza.

Taylor:

Yeah.

Taylor:

Same with my partner.

Taylor:

I think he had, he, he like passed out one time when he was here.

Taylor:

So I like called EMS cause he was pale.

Taylor:

Like I I'd never seen him that pale before.

Taylor:

And so, they came and they, they tested his blood sugar and I was

Taylor:

like, Oh, that's all I needed to do.

Taylor:

I could have did that for you.

Taylor:

And they looked at me and I'm like, Diabetic in the house.

Taylor:

Hello.

Taylor:

So they're like, Oh, okay.

Taylor:

You know what you're doing?

Taylor:

I'm like, yeah.

Taylor:

And so they tested him and he was like, he was like 90 something.

Taylor:

I'm like, yeah, Just share your blood sugar.

Taylor:

Okay.

Taylor:

Share your metabolism, share your blood sugar.

Taylor:

There's no fat on this man at all.

Taylor:

And same thing.

Taylor:

He can eat a whole box of pizza and I'm just like, I just don't understand why

Taylor:

just a little bit, we joke all the time.

Taylor:

Like, just like, let me tray, my abs with you.

Taylor:

You put in the work and the swap back.

Taylor:

That's all I really want.

Taylor:

God bless our partners and their amazing bodies.

Taylor:

Okay.

Taylor:

So I.

Taylor:

I want to actually kind of shift into speaking of partners, kind of how

Taylor:

your life has adjusted, going through not only having diabetes at such a

Taylor:

younger age and it not being directly like type one you already answered my

Taylor:

question of like the other types, which.

Taylor:

As we learned today, there are 15.

Taylor:

And so, but how has knowing, that you have MODY like change your day to day,

Taylor:

from, from going through it as a teenager, up until now, to the relationship with

Taylor:

your husband, like how is knowing that information really made it easier for

Taylor:

you to manage your diagnosis as well?

Taylor:

Yeah.

Kylie:

So when I first was diagnosed with diabetes since it wasn't

Kylie:

type one, and since MODY still, we still make some of our own insulin.

Kylie:

You're just not making enough.

Kylie:

I was able to just take, different type two medications.

Kylie:

I was able to take sulphonylurea, which is the medication that Seems to

Kylie:

work really well for people with MODY.

Kylie:

So, in high school and in college that was nice to not have to inject insulin.

Kylie:

But as far as my relationship with my husband goes with diabetes,

Kylie:

he's kind of gone through.

Kylie:

Some different phases of diabetes with me, we've been together for 10

Kylie:

years and my management has varied wildly through those 10 years.

Kylie:

So when we first met, I was heading into college and for the four

Kylie:

years of college, I basically.

Kylie:

Pretended like I didn't have diabetes, which I was really able to do because with

Kylie:

MODY, I was just, had to take my pills.

Kylie:

And then for me, that was my management, but that it wasn't good.

Kylie:

I was eating whatever I wanted.

Kylie:

I wasn't exercising.

Kylie:

So always had a high A1C, but you know, he went through that with me and

Kylie:

probably just thought diabetes is no

Taylor:

big deal.

Taylor:

And

Kylie:

then after college, when I decided.

Kylie:

No, this is a thing I actually need to take care of my health.

Kylie:

He, went on the low carb journey with me and we ate low carb for quite a few years.

Kylie:

And when I actually started checking my blood sugar, he had to learn about

Kylie:

what's a good blood sugar, what's a bad blood sugar and that type of thing.

Kylie:

Stuff.

Kylie:

And now that I've transitioned onto insulin, it's kind of our third phase and

Kylie:

he's had to learn a lot more about what to do if an extreme, low blood sugar happens

Kylie:

or how I need to make sure I actually know exactly how many carbs are in things

Kylie:

and what time food is going to be ready.

Kylie:

So he's gone through those different phases and had to kind

Kylie:

of relearn a lot of diabetes stuff.

Kylie:

And then he also.

Kylie:

I've had had the talk of our children might also have diabetes.

Kylie:

So

Taylor:

that's a big part.

Taylor:

So what was the transition like from, from just oral medication to insulin?

Taylor:

Because, my dad had to be put on insulin, but it was kind of like, Hey, your

Taylor:

numbers are just so crazy right now.

Taylor:

Like we need to bring you down ASAP.

Taylor:

And he does insulin and a Trulicity shot.

Taylor:

More medication, more medication.

Taylor:

And his insulin has gone down since doing the shot and like

Taylor:

myself, I'm on oral medication.

Taylor:

And then I take in Olympic shot once a week, which I'm actually kind of cut down.

Taylor:

Cause I was doing a Metformin combo, the combo glasses extended release and

Taylor:

glipizide, and my endocrinologists, like, glipizides like old school.

Taylor:

We need to get you off of that.

Taylor:

So now I'm taking

Kylie:

glipizide is what works.

Kylie:

For people with MODY, it's really old school.

Kylie:

And so with type two, they're moving away from it.

Kylie:

But with MODY just respond crazy.

Kylie:

Like they take it in blood sugar, like goes down.

Kylie:

It's like people are usually super sensitive to it.

Kylie:

Wow.

Kylie:

Wow.

Kylie:

That's why.

Kylie:

Yeah.

Kylie:

Knowing that you have MODY versus type two can be really important because

Kylie:

with type two, they're trying to move away from the sulphonylureas like that.

Kylie:

But if you have MODY, that's the first thing they try to put you on.

Taylor:

Wow.

Taylor:

Interesting.

Taylor:

Cause yeah, I was put on.

Taylor:

So at first I was put on Metformin and my doctor wanted to be mindful because

Taylor:

I was sensitive to the stomach issues.

Taylor:

And so I was like, Oh, this is not, I don't need it to be bad.

Taylor:

Mexican night, every time I take these drugs.

Taylor:

Okay.

Taylor:

I can't.

Taylor:

And so the glipizide was to help, to, to slow having to ramp up the Metformin.

Taylor:

And then I had switched doctors at that point and she was like,

Taylor:

let's take you off the glipizide.

Taylor:

Let's up your Metformin, let's try and extended release.

Taylor:

And if that doesn't work, then we'll add the glypocide back.

Taylor:

And so it helped a little bit, but she did add it back.

Taylor:

And then I finally decided to go see an endocrinologist just from talking

Taylor:

with different people in the space.

Taylor:

And I'm like, well, for type two, a lot of times you just

Taylor:

have your primary manage it.

Taylor:

But I was like, after learning about, late onset type one and, and MODY and

Taylor:

everything, I'm like, let me make sure.

Taylor:

Right.

Taylor:

So that's what really pushed me in.

Taylor:

I was trying to get a CGM because the meter, the manual meter

Taylor:

just wasn't doing it for me.

Taylor:

I was still having weird numbers.

Taylor:

Couldn't understand.

Taylor:

And so, I'm legitimately type two.

Taylor:

But yeah, he was like, Oh yeah.

Taylor:

Now let's put you on because those still get your numbers low or in

Taylor:

range they'll help you with weight loss, which I'm not a big fan of

Taylor:

because it's, it's been suppressing my appetite and he's like, I need you

Taylor:

to eat at least three times a day.

Taylor:

I'm like, you know how hard that is now, but yeah, like

Taylor:

I'm not hungry ever, which is.

Taylor:

Cool, I guess, cause I, I work through eating a lot, so it's not that I'm not

Taylor:

used to that, but I would still feel it.

Taylor:

Yeah.

Taylor:

If you like, you enjoy

Kylie:

eating, so you want to

Taylor:

eat.

Taylor:

Yeah.

Taylor:

Yeah.

Taylor:

I like food.

Taylor:

Food is great.

Taylor:

I like I'm in taco city, like come on.

Taylor:

And so I, spent some time trying to, to figure out like, Understanding

Taylor:

the differences of them and you know how the syndrome, it dumps everything

Taylor:

in a year and stuff like that.

Taylor:

But that was one of the things that he said, he was like, yeah,

Taylor:

the glypocide is so old school.

Taylor:

Like you don't need to on that.

Kylie:

I took 14 years, which is similar

Taylor:

to glypocide.

Taylor:

That's crazy.

Taylor:

Wow.

Taylor:

So many, so many things.

Taylor:

So, yeah,

Kylie:

but you were asking.

Kylie:

About my transition to insulin.

Taylor:

Yes.

Taylor:

Yes.

Taylor:

What, what brought that on?

Taylor:

Was it, was it something that you asked for or was it something

Taylor:

that your medical team was like, I think we should, move on to that.

Taylor:

And how did that make you feel?

Taylor:

Cause sometimes, in our spaces going on insulin feels like,

Taylor:

like the end of the week.

Kylie:

Yeah.

Kylie:

Like it's like the downfall, like you failed because you

Kylie:

had to start taking insulin.

Kylie:

So.

Kylie:

I actually started taking insulin because I finally got an endocrinol.

Kylie:

So I just had primary care taking care of my diabetes for forever.

Kylie:

Never.

Kylie:

I saw an inter endocrinologist once or twice.

Kylie:

But I finally got an endocrinologist because I wanted to start

Kylie:

getting ready to have children.

Kylie:

And so none of the type two medications except maybe Metformin or

Kylie:

Approved for pregnancy and Metformin doesn't really do much for me.

Kylie:

So we decided to transition to insulin, but I've actually found

Kylie:

that I like it much better than just being on oral medication.

Kylie:

So when I was on oral medication, I was having to work.

Taylor:

So.

Taylor:

Hard

Kylie:

to have a good A1C.

Kylie:

I was eating keto.

Kylie:

I was trying to keep under like 30 carbs a day.

Kylie:

I was scared of carbs.

Kylie:

I would see something that had 12 carbs in it and say, no, I can't eat that.

Kylie:

I.

Kylie:

And my A1C would then be good.

Kylie:

It would be like 6.3, which is great.

Kylie:

But I remember just thinking my A1C is good, but I just, I can't

Taylor:

eat anything.

Taylor:

Yeah.

Taylor:

Like I can't eat and have good diabetes.

Kylie:

And I had never really expressed that to anyone until after

Kylie:

I started insulin, when I was like, Oh, my gosh, I can eat food and I can

Kylie:

still have a great A1C and I don't have to be scared of things anymore.

Kylie:

So that's kind of how my transition has gone and that I feel very strongly.

Kylie:

That insulin definitely is not a failure for me.

Kylie:

It has created a sense of freedom that I didn't have before.

Kylie:

And Yeah, I just don't feel like it's like a bad thing for me.

Kylie:

It's been awesome.

Taylor:

So, and, and are you doing just a manual injections or have you tried

Taylor:

out pumps or anything like that yet?

Kylie:

Yeah, no, I'm just on pens.

Kylie:

Because to start, this was obviously just supposed to be like, okay, for you to get

Kylie:

ready to have kids and then have babies.

Kylie:

And then I think I assumed I would go back on pills after that, but I don't

Kylie:

know that I want to do that anymore.

Kylie:

So yeah, I take my long acting insulin at night and my short acting with

Kylie:

meals and I just have pens right now.

Taylor:

Wow.

Taylor:

Okay.

Taylor:

So I have to ask this because seeing so many people take insulin, there's

Taylor:

all of these memes and stuff and online about, about the math part.

Taylor:

And I'm, I'm vaguely aware of it, but I don't fully understand

Taylor:

it cause it's not my day to day.

Taylor:

So how, how are you?

Taylor:

Dosing yourself for the meals that you're having.

Taylor:

I guess you could use, I saw you had a cupcake the other day for

Taylor:

three or one year, so I'd love to understand how that, how that works.

Taylor:

So the cupcake

Kylie:

was kind of a guess, but I guessed that the cupcake was 35 carbs.

Kylie:

I think that's what I went with.

Kylie:

So I take one unit of insulin for every seven carbs I eat.

Kylie:

So that meant I had to of course, divide 35 by seven to figure

Kylie:

out that I needed to take five units of insulin for the cupcake.

Kylie:

So it's not quite as complicated as sometimes people make it sound,

Kylie:

but when you're eating multiple foods, you have to add it all up and

Kylie:

then you have to divide and then.

Kylie:

If your blood sugar is high, you have to remember what your correction factor is.

Kylie:

So like one unit will bring me down 50 points.

Kylie:

So I will add one unit on if I'm 150, when I start eating.

Kylie:

Yeah, so horribly complicated, but it is a little more to think about

Kylie:

than when you're just on medication.

Kylie:

So you're probably aware of how many carbs are in most things

Kylie:

because you have diabetes.

Kylie:

So you're checking, making sure it's not something over the top, but once

Kylie:

you are actually taking insulin, you have to then put math behind.

Kylie:

How

Taylor:

much you're going to inject.

Taylor:

I kind of, it's funny because math was not my favorite thing.

Taylor:

My mom loves math and to the point where she got me and my sister

Taylor:

pajamas that says math is hard.

Taylor:

I was like, no.

Taylor:

And, and my mom actually, went through that phase of like, where

Taylor:

it seemed like her doctors were threatening her with insulin.

Taylor:

And so that center, into this overdrive.

Taylor:

And she actually came off a good portion of her meds, but it's just

Taylor:

like, yo insulin can be super helpful.

Taylor:

It doesn't have to be, end all scary thing.

Taylor:

But it's adding

Kylie:

another medication.

Kylie:

Like yeah, if you're creeping up and then your doctor says, well,

Kylie:

why don't we add a Trulicity shot?

Kylie:

Like, that's not a failure.

Kylie:

That's just another tool that you are gaining to help keep yourself

Taylor:

healthy.

Taylor:

Yeah.

Taylor:

Yeah.

Taylor:

It's interesting that you, that you mentioned that because in some spaces or

Taylor:

at least I know my endocrinologist, my dad is kind of going through that, trying

Taylor:

to find that fine line between okay.

Taylor:

Being added, give being, given this added medication is helpful versus, okay.

Taylor:

You're just kind of stacking based off of the symptoms that are going on.

Taylor:

Because one thing that comes up for us is a heart health.

Taylor:

So statin drugs for like cholesterol and things like that, and trying to protect

Taylor:

your heart, but then sometimes certain Staten drugs can make you gain weight,

Taylor:

which is the opposite of what you want.

Taylor:

So how has working with your medical team, ensure that the medications that

Taylor:

they're adjusting for you would that be, Hey, we're just going to do insulin or

Taylor:

let's do oral and insulin, is actually progressing you versus kind of just

Taylor:

stacking things to treat something.

Kylie:

And I've had trouble with since just going to like a primary care

Kylie:

doctor, I have had trouble with them.

Kylie:

Totally not knowing what MODY is.

Kylie:

And so when I went in and my A1C was like right at seven and I was

Kylie:

already on glimepiride and Januvia.

Kylie:

So I was already on two different medications and I had a.

Kylie:

Intern, I think working with me, she had taken over my care and she really

Kylie:

didn't know much about diabetes.

Kylie:

So all she did, she came in and she said, well, you have diabetes

Kylie:

and you're not on Metformin.

Kylie:

So we're just going to go ahead and put you on Metformin.

Kylie:

And there was no reasoning that like, Oh, it's your blood sugar must be going

Kylie:

higher because you're experiencing this.

Kylie:

It was just, Oh, well, you're diabetic and you're not on Metformin.

Kylie:

So

Taylor:

yeah, you really have to.

Taylor:

Yeah.

Taylor:

Figure out if like, is this medication really helping me

Kylie:

or is it just being thrown on there because the doctor doesn't

Kylie:

really know what else to do with me.

Taylor:

Yeah.

Taylor:

So did you do a lot of personal research or did you get second opinions from,

Taylor:

from other medical professionals when stuff like that would come up?

Taylor:

No.

Taylor:

No.

Taylor:

I

Kylie:

wish that I was better about that.

Kylie:

And I better about advocating for myself, but I just really didn't know a lot.

Kylie:

I wasn't super educated about what MODY was.

Kylie:

Is either and I'm not super great at sticking up for myself.

Kylie:

So I didn't question it.

Kylie:

I was just like, okay, I'll add two more pills to my cocktail here.

Kylie:

So it wasn't really, until now I'm going to an endocrinologist and I was

Kylie:

kinda like, wow, this is probably what I should have been doing this whole time.

Kylie:

Someone who actually has the research and the back background to know

Kylie:

a little more about what to do

Taylor:

with my management.

Taylor:

Yeah.

Taylor:

That's something that, that popped up in a clubhouse room that I was in,

Taylor:

where she was a primary care physician.

Taylor:

They were talking about diabetes tech in, in the medical space.

Taylor:

And she was saying in her, I think she was in Arkansas that endocrinologists

Taylor:

were like, Booked out for months and that a lot of primary care physicians

Taylor:

were having to take on learning and understanding about diabetes because it's

Taylor:

changing so much because no one can get ahold of an endocrinologist to really,

Taylor:

decipher the data on what's going on.

Taylor:

So I definitely feel like.

Taylor:

The medical world is having to push to stay up to date.

Taylor:

And not just from a specialist standpoint, because if a primary care physician

Taylor:

can treat diabetes in some form and prescribed medication for it, then they

Taylor:

have to work to be up to date on all the different forms and other types

Taylor:

of medications that can help for that because it's growing and it's, it's like

Taylor:

a weird, like it's growing and you're like, Aw, man, I understand that this

Taylor:

can be hard for people, but at the same time, we're such a great community.

Taylor:

And a lot of us are thriving.

Taylor:

So it's like, What do I cheer

Kylie:

for?

Kylie:

Like, do I cheer that

Taylor:

we have space for you or do I'm like, Aw, this sucks.

Taylor:

Not enough.

Taylor:

Welcome.

Taylor:

We're not

Kylie:

really

Taylor:

happy you're here, but like, we got you to ask if he knew.

Taylor:

Yeah.

Taylor:

Yeah, it's interesting.

Taylor:

And kind of crazy, which kind of leads me into, your, your advocacy for MODY.

Taylor:

Cause again, had it not been for what you've been doing on, on

Taylor:

Instagram, I never would have known.

Taylor:

So I would love to hear more about why you decided to just be so open and share your

Taylor:

journey about your experience with MODY.

Taylor:

Yeah.

Kylie:

Basically, so on my personal Instagram, I had just started following

Kylie:

some different people with diabetes, looking up the hashtag diabetes,

Kylie:

following people with different types and I had a friend who actually started

Kylie:

her own type one Instagram page.

Kylie:

And so kind of after she saw, after she did that, and I kind

Kylie:

of saw what she was doing.

Kylie:

I started searching for people with MODY and trying to find hashtags

Kylie:

about it and different accounts.

Kylie:

And I just couldn't find a single account of a person with MODY that

Kylie:

that's what they were talking about.

Kylie:

So it was, smack dab in the middle of.

Kylie:

Quarantine.

Kylie:

And I had lots and lots of free time.

Kylie:

And so I just decided to go ahead and make an account about MODY

Kylie:

because I couldn't find any anywhere.

Kylie:

So I thought might as well make my own and it's become.

Kylie:

So much bigger than I ever thought it would be.

Kylie:

I didn't think anybody would care, but suddenly after my first educational

Kylie:

posts, there were tons of people who were so interested and so

Kylie:

willing to, learn and find out more.

Kylie:

And

Taylor:

it's been really exciting.

Taylor:

Yeah.

Taylor:

No, I've, I've seen so.

Taylor:

I indirectly came across, excuse me, your, your account because I follow

Taylor:

certain diabetic hashtags cause very similar to you when I was diagnosed

Taylor:

type one, community is strong.

Taylor:

Like they've been strong for a minute, right?

Taylor:

Because either you have it.

Taylor:

Because you've had it from such a young age or you're a caregiver, for kids

Taylor:

or family members, but for type two, especially because it's something that

Taylor:

is not easily detectable, it's hard to know the community because if you're

Taylor:

not asking your doctor to regularly test you every year for it, you have no clue.

Taylor:

And sometimes it might be too late.

Taylor:

And so finding people who are type two.

Taylor:

That are my age was really hard.

Taylor:

Now it's a lot easier and it's cool.

Taylor:

And I've, let go of just looking for type two.

Taylor:

I'm like, okay, as diabetics, we all go through your own stuff.

Taylor:

So let me just find everybody.

Taylor:

And it was, I can't remember what test check it was, but they had, we

Taylor:

posted your picture about cinnamon doesn't cure diabetes who started that?

Taylor:

I only

Kylie:

know relevant in type team spaces.

Kylie:

Like it's posted about so much in like Facebook, diabetes, support

Kylie:

groups, somebody will be like, I'm taking cinnamon every day and now my

Kylie:

diabetes is reversed and I'm like, no,

Taylor:

don't tell people that.

Taylor:

Stoplight.

Taylor:

Like, there's just no amount that you can take.

Taylor:

Like I put cinnamon on my, tea and coffee drinks, because I just genuinely likes it.

Taylor:

Like it has nothing to do it.

Taylor:

Same thing with tumeric, I've seen that be like, Hey, tumeric is, is a natural

Taylor:

seasoning that can help adjustments.

Taylor:

And that's, that's great.

Taylor:

It's

Kylie:

still not a cure and it's still not necessarily even a medication.

Taylor:

Yeah.

Taylor:

Yeah.

Taylor:

And I feel like you'd have to eat the whole root plant just for it

Taylor:

to actually move the needle a bit.

Taylor:

But I like golden milk.

Taylor:

Cause I just like it, and it's great for a face mask, but to make sure my blood sugar

Taylor:

is in check, I don't know who started that, but that, that got my attention.

Taylor:

And then when they, repost, it, it, they included your caption and

Taylor:

that's when I saw your hash, your your handle of my life with MODY.

Taylor:

I'm like.

Taylor:

What is that?

Taylor:

Let me see.

Taylor:

Oh, Oh, Oh.

Kylie:

I actually, I don't like the accounts that repost stuff like

Kylie:

that because they actually it's mostly them stealing other people's.

Kylie:

Stuff and reposting it without permission.

Kylie:

But I do like hearing that you found me, they did, they did credit

Taylor:

feelings

Kylie:

about this account that re posted my posts I'm positive without permission,

Kylie:

because that post went everywhere.

Kylie:

I was like constantly reporting or like messaging, like, Hey,

Kylie:

you didn't have my permission.

Kylie:

Stop reposting my

Taylor:

stuff.

Taylor:

Yeah.

Taylor:

Instagrams, weird like that because, I have the, the repost app, and

Taylor:

I didn't really think about it because, it's, it's the, a lot of

Taylor:

people are bothered by the credit.

Taylor:

And so this one, it credits your account and make sure that like it's

Taylor:

showing from that, but I'm just like, ah, Yeah, maybe I should ask because

Taylor:

it's, it's, it's important that you feel comfortable with where it's going.

Taylor:

And

Kylie:

it really depends on like, if you had re posted something like that, I can

Kylie:

see that you are a real person and that you are, you have diabetes and stuff.

Kylie:

It's these accounts that say, like, I have diabetes FA follow for tips and tricks to

Kylie:

reverse, and then it has a, we're like to buy a t-shirt and it has a weird sketchy.

Kylie:

Yeah.

Kylie:

Link, like I'm not, please do not repost my stuff to sell your sketchy.

Kylie:

T-shirt on a link that might give someone a computer virus.

Kylie:

Like I that's where I really draw the line is when it seems like it's almost

Kylie:

not a real person running the account.

Kylie:

And, and when everything they post is just.

Kylie:

Posts from other people in the diabetes online community I've started

Kylie:

blocking all of those accounts.

Kylie:

Can't

Taylor:

even steal my stuff.

Taylor:

It's, it's crazy.

Taylor:

Whenever you're trying to do the right thing and just provide, your

Taylor:

personal experience and these bot accounts are just, especially now

Taylor:

that I've started doing video, like.

Taylor:

I get so many messages now from like, let me get your YouTube views.

Taylor:

And I'm like, you have zero followers.

Kylie:

Oh yeah.

Kylie:

You have zero followers and a weird name that makes no sense.

Kylie:

It's like, what is this

Taylor:

picture?

Taylor:

Is that like, are you messaging?

Taylor:

Is that a Voltron picture?

Taylor:

Oh, it just out of the woodworks or like a promoted on this, at

Taylor:

the same account that does it.

Taylor:

And then I go to, and it's like, okay, it looks like you are promoting

Taylor:

podcasts, but then I click the link and it's for something weird.

Taylor:

I'm like, Yeah.

Taylor:

So if you guys are listening out there, you're seeing these

Taylor:

crazy accounts that don't seem to have a real person behind it.

Taylor:

It's usually those tips, those, those tips accounts or nutrition accounts.

Taylor:

Sometimes you got to look out for cause slimy anyways.

Taylor:

So, do you have any plans to, to kind of expand on, on your life with money?

Taylor:

So if I know, you, you, you seem very passionate about your musical

Taylor:

therapy and I think that's awesome, but now that you're kind of getting

Taylor:

this, traction of like people wanting to connect with you, because finally

Taylor:

someone with MODY is able to, Oh, they look like me, they, understand

Taylor:

the things that I'm going through.

Taylor:

Do you have any plans to expand that to, to any other forms of advocacy or.

Kylie:

Currently, not really.

Kylie:

I have a take talk where I've posted a few videos, but that's, it's really

Kylie:

just, it's more my personal tick talk and it's just kind of for fun.

Kylie:

And I just, watch other people's mindlessly scroll for hours.

Kylie:

But no, right now I'm just kind of focusing on the Instagram.

Kylie:

I think it's Reaching a lot of people that way.

Kylie:

And I have had a lot of people just like you who say, Hey,

Kylie:

I never heard about this.

Kylie:

I learned about it because of you.

Kylie:

I had someone message me yesterday and say, thank you.

Kylie:

My son just got diagnosed with MODY because I found your account and then

Kylie:

was able to ask for him to be tested.

Kylie:

So right now I'm pretty comfortable with kind of where I'm

Taylor:

at.

Kylie:

I guess the next step could be like a blog, but I don't know how, how much

Kylie:

I would actually put into that storage.

Kylie:

But I can't, I can plug if anybody's interested in a MODY blog.

Kylie:

My friend, Jesse, who also now has a MODY diabetes, Instagram account

Kylie:

has her blog is called MODY and me.

Kylie:

So I can plug her account because she's doing the work too.

Taylor:

Awesome.

Taylor:

Yeah, I'll definitely put her information in the show notes because I think the

Taylor:

more that we have a us in the community sharing our individual stories, like it's,

Taylor:

it makes it so much easier to connect.

Taylor:

And I love that someone was able to reach out to you and

Taylor:

be like, Oh my God, thank God.

Taylor:

Because that's how I felt.

Taylor:

When I came into the space, I'm like, finally my peers, we can talk about

Taylor:

things, because as we continue to grow, So many things change in our world and

Taylor:

it's nice to be able to just lean or just watch and be like, okay, I can go

Taylor:

have a drink or I can have a cupcake or I can travel, or I can do these things.

Taylor:

And it's so great to see us being so dynamic and expansive

Taylor:

in so many different spaces.

Taylor:

And you never know who's watching and who's life.

Taylor:

You might change simply because They can relate to your story.

Taylor:

So, thank you so much for, being willing to be vulnerable online

Taylor:

and share your experiences.

Taylor:

Because again, I had no idea and I feel so much better because now

Taylor:

I can be, I can adjust my language in, Hey, are you a diabetic?

Taylor:

What type, and, and not assume that it's one or two, because we're all kind of

Taylor:

conditioned to think that that's it, these do, and it was easy to manage that way.

Taylor:

And I think it's, it's challenging us all, from a medical side to nonmedical

Taylor:

side to grow and to understand that like, we have to be willing to.

Taylor:

Address the fact that this is very individual and we can't treat

Taylor:

things like a one size fits all.

Taylor:

I think a lot of stuff in the world is, is pointing to that.

Taylor:

Like, we could be a community, but it doesn't mean that you are lost in

Taylor:

the crowd there, you still stand out.

Taylor:

Well, that's really awesome.

Taylor:

I'm excited to continue following your account and see all the cool

Taylor:

things that you're up to and, and to check out your friend's blog as well.

Taylor:

So that leads me to my last kind of two questions.

Taylor:

I would love to know, and I love to ask all of my diabetic guests,

Taylor:

this what's one piece of advice that you would give somebody who is

Taylor:

newly diagnosed with MODY, or maybe they've been misdiagnosed as type two.

Taylor:

And now they found out they're correct diagnosis with MODY.

Taylor:

What's the piece of advice that you would give to them.

Kylie:

I would just say, and I need to take this advice as well.

Kylie:

It's just that you have to be your own an advocate, especially if you

Kylie:

have a rare type of diabetes, you need to advocate that you are different

Kylie:

than type one, or that you are different, that type than type two.

Kylie:

And that things might be different that your treatment might need to be different.

Kylie:

And it took me until.

Kylie:

Learning so much about MODY because of my account.

Kylie:

I've learned.

Kylie:

I feel just as much as you guys that now I know all of this and I feel empowered

Kylie:

to be able to advocate for myself.

Kylie:

But yeah, you just, you have to be your own advocate because.

Kylie:

Nobody else is really going to stand up for you

Taylor:

the way you are.

Taylor:

Yeah.

Taylor:

Yeah.

Taylor:

You best, so make sure that whatever you're receiving is

Taylor:

with your best interest in mind.

Taylor:

Absolutely.

Taylor:

I love that.

Taylor:

I love that.

Taylor:

So how can people connect with you if they want to see if you decide to do, a

Taylor:

MODY blog or maybe if you throw the music into it and make like a diabetic group.

Taylor:

Playlist or something like that, how can they keep up with you and

Taylor:

all the cool things you're doing?

Kylie:

Right now it's just my Instagram

Taylor:

at my life with MODY.

Taylor:

That's awesome.

Taylor:

I will ensure that that is in the show notes.

Taylor:

And thank you for all of the resources as well.

Taylor:

You guys, she left me with a bunch of great information, so I will make

Taylor:

sure everybody has access to that.

Taylor:

Again, Kylie, I am so grateful.

Taylor:

You definitely taught me a lot.

Taylor:

Okay.

Taylor:

So at the top you were you're nervous.

Taylor:

Trust me.

Taylor:

I learned a lot.

Taylor:

I've got some more research to do alongside these these articles you sent

Taylor:

me Well, you guys, thank you so much for spending your time with us today.

Taylor:

Remember every Tuesday and Thursday you can check out the show at

Taylor:

healing and hindsight on Instagram.

Taylor:

If you want to know what I'm up to or who my next guest is.

Taylor:

Thank y'all.

Taylor:

My brain is still rapping.

Taylor:

I'm still trying to understand 15 different types of MODY by itself.

Taylor:

Okay.

Taylor:

Just, just MODY diabetes.

Taylor:

There's still a type three.

Taylor:

That's got to, there's so many types you guys and wow, Kylie.

Taylor:

Thank you.

Taylor:

Thank you again so much for just being willing to share your story and

Taylor:

your vulnerability and all the things that you've gone through and, being

Taylor:

a huge advocate for people so that they can understand what's going on.

Taylor:

To have a family reach out and say, Hey, I was able to tell my, son's

Taylor:

medical team to retest to make sure that he's got the right diagnosis

Taylor:

and everything that is truly awesome.

Taylor:

So seriously go follow Kylie at my life with MODY on Instagram.

Taylor:

And I will ensure to link everything that she shared in the show notes,

Taylor:

including her friend who also has a blog all about MODY MODY and me.

Taylor:

That's so cute.

Taylor:

I love it like Marley and me.

Taylor:

Okay.

Taylor:

Anyways make sure that you just, you just keep up guys.

Taylor:

I mean, as technology evolves as our diagnosis changed, like there's so much

Taylor:

information out there that we can learn.

Taylor:

There's so much that we can do to ensure that we're making sure people are aware

Taylor:

that there's more than just two types.

Taylor:

And Hey, if you're a type two diabetic like myself and you were diagnosed,

Taylor:

at a fairly early age or, rounds that.

Taylor:

Early twenties type of thing.

Taylor:

Talk to your medical team.

Taylor:

I went and talked to mine and ensure that you've been diagnosed correctly,

Taylor:

especially if you have a family history of it, because it could make

Taylor:

or break your experience as a diabetic.

Taylor:

And we want to make sure that we're doing everything that we can to

Taylor:

optimize our bodies, to make sure that this disease does not control us.

Taylor:

So Kylie, thank you again.

Taylor:

Thank you all for listening and for your time and energy and